>First of all, the feeding ramp is polished to a mirror sheen.

>First of all, the feeding ramp is polished to a mirror sheen. It's not going to have any feeding problems. The slide's been replaced with a reinforced version, and it meshes perfectly with the frame. The frame itself has been iron-welded and scraped down multiple times for maximum precision. The front strap part of the frame has been checkered to make it dig into the hand. That prevents any slipping. The sight system's original too. It's a 3-dot type. It's got an enlarged front sight, giving it superior target sighting capability. The regular hammer's been replaced with a ring hammer. That enhances the wienering control and increases the hammer-down speed. They also reworked the grip safety to accommodate the ring hammer. It looks like they eliminated it altogether. This is a tool for pros. The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling. The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip, and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access. The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal. The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine. The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake. The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing. On top of that, they added wienering serrations to the top part of the slide. That lets you load and eject cartridges faster in an emergency. Whoever did this is a professional, no question. This thing could shoot a one-hole at 25 yards in a machine rest.
How good is the gun he is describing?

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LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty good.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    forty-five, huh?

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    about as good as ya muddah

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    excellent gun. but too tight for a field duty gun. a nice milsurp 1911 is loose as a goose and dead nuts reliable.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty good.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is the MGS3 gun a stainless slide?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's hard to tell since the in-game models are not very high-res, but I believe according to the original mock-up made for the game, the slide was blued but the flats of the slide were polished.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >slide was blued but the flats of the slide were polished.
          Polished in the white? Or high polish blue
          Man, they're really hard to distinguish in game.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            like a directional polish blue that just picks up light in one direction, like

            https://i.imgur.com/ucfHbYo.jpeg

            Pretty good.

            does
            royal blue polish youd be able to see it was blued since its mirror like

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Frick. My dumb ass thought it was in the white

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                no, I thought it the slides were brushed white when I was a kid as well, I figured the slide was brush in white and covered in wax as some kind of jungle rust measure
                all those companies making twotone "equinox" like 1911s are pretty much copying mgs3 and not sig sauer

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How good is the gun he is describing?

    >Polished feed ramp
    Irrelevant, feed issues are almost always due to either the extractor being improperly tensioned or the magazine feed lips being the wrong configuration for the ammo type being used. Since it's 1964, they're probably only using 230gr FMJ, so any problems it had before the polish would have been the extractor
    >Reinforced slide
    Never heard of it. Typically the slide is retained while the frame is replaced with one that has oversized slide rails so that they can be fitted more precisely or...
    >The frame itself has been iron-welded and scraped down multiple times for maximum precision
    The slide rails can be welded up and reshaped to achieve the same effect
    >The front strap part of the frame has been checkered to make it dig into the hand. That prevents any slipping
    Common modification. I personally don't care for it, but a lot of people like it.
    >The sight system's original too. It's a 3-dot type. It's got an enlarged front sight, giving it superior target sighting capability.
    It's better than GI sights.
    >The regular hammer's been replaced with a ring hammer. That enhances the wienering control and increases the hammer-down speed
    The only real reason to replace a spur with a Rowel hammer is if you change the grip safety to an upswept beavertail. The spur is actually much easier to manipulate. The hammer speed refers to lock time (the time between the trigger being pulled and the gun firing) and a lighter hammer WILL decrease lock time, but only marginally. It only makes a difference at top level competition
    >They also reworked the grip safety to accommodate the ring hammer. It looks like they eliminated it altogether. This is a tool for pros.
    Again, the rowel hammer accommodates an upswept grip safety, not the other way around. The grip safety isn't strictly necessary, but there's also no reason to remove its functionality.
    (con't)

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      (con't)
      >The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling.
      Extended safety levers are still common and quite popular. The original safety lever is kind of small and stubby. Extended slide stops were a popular mod in the 60s and 70s, but they fell out of favor because the added mass of the longer lever could cause the slide stop to lock the slide back prematurely due to inertia
      >The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip
      Undercut trigger guards are a popular feature due to newer shooting methods encouraging as high a grip as possible
      >and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
      A longer trigger makes finger access harder, not easier. The 1911 A1 shortened the trigger to make it easier for people with smaller hands. The long trigger came back into fashion as people moved to two-handed shooting and the adjusted grip made the short trigger feel too short
      >The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal
      Common trigger job. 3.5 is a competition trigger, most people wouldn't go below 4.5 for a duty/defense handgun
      >The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine
      Beveled mag wells are basically standard these days. Generally a good addition
      >The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake
      Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
      >The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing
      Mainspring housing shape is just a preference thing. Flat ones are more popular these days due to the modern two-handed grip, but the A1 added an arch to raise the natural point of aim when point shooting. The checkering/serrations were pretty much always standard, so not really worth mentioning

      (con't)

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
        Not in the real gun competition world, but it's real in airsoft.
        I still have one of my old airsoft magazines that had a DIY article on how to file down a mag catch from a HiCapa. The reason for it is that during an airsoft game losing a $30 GBB mag to a shitty fabric holster letting the mag catch get hit is a PITA.
        Kojimbo most likely got the 'tism 1911 monologue from looking into real shooting and airsoft, so the two things got mixed up.

        >iron-welded and scraped down multiple times
        What the frick does this even mean? I’ve never heard of “iron-welding” and I’m a machinist, we don’t “scrape down” shit.

        The problem of jargon getting translated from Japanese to English.
        "Iron-welding" they laid a weld to refill the rail groove, perhaps in Japanese it requires the mention of iron to differentiate from brazing
        "Scraped down" most likely refers to the use of cutters dialed in and then sending the frame back and forth in a jig which vaguely looks like scraping to the layman.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
        Not in the real gun competition world, but it's real in airsoft.
        I still have one of my old airsoft magazines that had a DIY article on how to file down a mag catch from a HiCapa. The reason for it is that during an airsoft game losing a $30 GBB mag to a shitty fabric holster letting the mag catch get hit is a PITA.
        Kojimbo most likely got the 'tism 1911 monologue from looking into real shooting and airsoft, so the two things got mixed up.
        [...]
        The problem of jargon getting translated from Japanese to English.
        "Iron-welding" they laid a weld to refill the rail groove, perhaps in Japanese it requires the mention of iron to differentiate from brazing
        "Scraped down" most likely refers to the use of cutters dialed in and then sending the frame back and forth in a jig which vaguely looks like scraping to the layman.

        >Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
        Like 1/4 of police bodycam vids have the cops dropping mags accidentally due to hitting the mag catch. It's a good change.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          And the Gen 4 and Gen 5 Glocks (which is what you see in the vast majority of Police bodycam footage) have a much larger mag catch than the Gen 1-3 Glocks or a standard 1911A1, which were not prone to accidental mag drops.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Common trigger job. 3.5 is a competition trigger, most people wouldn't go below 4.5 for a duty/defense handgun
        Tangentially, why not? Especially on a gun with a manual safety that effectively lets you increase the trigger pull weight to infinity at will.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      (con't)
      >The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling.
      Extended safety levers are still common and quite popular. The original safety lever is kind of small and stubby. Extended slide stops were a popular mod in the 60s and 70s, but they fell out of favor because the added mass of the longer lever could cause the slide stop to lock the slide back prematurely due to inertia
      >The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip
      Undercut trigger guards are a popular feature due to newer shooting methods encouraging as high a grip as possible
      >and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
      A longer trigger makes finger access harder, not easier. The 1911 A1 shortened the trigger to make it easier for people with smaller hands. The long trigger came back into fashion as people moved to two-handed shooting and the adjusted grip made the short trigger feel too short
      >The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal
      Common trigger job. 3.5 is a competition trigger, most people wouldn't go below 4.5 for a duty/defense handgun
      >The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine
      Beveled mag wells are basically standard these days. Generally a good addition
      >The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake
      Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
      >The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing
      Mainspring housing shape is just a preference thing. Flat ones are more popular these days due to the modern two-handed grip, but the A1 added an arch to raise the natural point of aim when point shooting. The checkering/serrations were pretty much always standard, so not really worth mentioning

      (con't)

      (con't)
      >On top of that, they added wienering serrations to the top part of the slide. That lets you load and eject cartridges faster in an emergency.
      Not really. The forward wienering serrations were originally added to aid in press checks (checking to see that a round is chambered) but those aren't really done anymore outside of competition
      >Whoever did this is a professional, no question. This thing could shoot a one-hole at 25 yards in a machine rest
      Many of these would require a pro gunsmith, but the slide-frame fit has very little to do with the overall accuracy of a 1911. The barrel-slide-bushing fit and barrel-slide stop fit is far more important. A tight slide-frame fit might decrease a group 1/4" at 50 yards with match ammo, but with 230gr ball, it wouldn't make a difference.

      All that being said, Snake doesn't have the internet, so any knowledge he has about guns would have to come from manuals, periodicals, or anecdotes, so he can't be blamed for believing some of the fuddlore or incorrect nomenclature he spouts

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        (con't)
        >The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling.
        Extended safety levers are still common and quite popular. The original safety lever is kind of small and stubby. Extended slide stops were a popular mod in the 60s and 70s, but they fell out of favor because the added mass of the longer lever could cause the slide stop to lock the slide back prematurely due to inertia
        >The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip
        Undercut trigger guards are a popular feature due to newer shooting methods encouraging as high a grip as possible
        >and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
        A longer trigger makes finger access harder, not easier. The 1911 A1 shortened the trigger to make it easier for people with smaller hands. The long trigger came back into fashion as people moved to two-handed shooting and the adjusted grip made the short trigger feel too short
        >The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal
        Common trigger job. 3.5 is a competition trigger, most people wouldn't go below 4.5 for a duty/defense handgun
        >The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine
        Beveled mag wells are basically standard these days. Generally a good addition
        >The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake
        Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
        >The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing
        Mainspring housing shape is just a preference thing. Flat ones are more popular these days due to the modern two-handed grip, but the A1 added an arch to raise the natural point of aim when point shooting. The checkering/serrations were pretty much always standard, so not really worth mentioning

        (con't)

        >How good is the gun he is describing?

        >Polished feed ramp
        Irrelevant, feed issues are almost always due to either the extractor being improperly tensioned or the magazine feed lips being the wrong configuration for the ammo type being used. Since it's 1964, they're probably only using 230gr FMJ, so any problems it had before the polish would have been the extractor
        >Reinforced slide
        Never heard of it. Typically the slide is retained while the frame is replaced with one that has oversized slide rails so that they can be fitted more precisely or...
        >The frame itself has been iron-welded and scraped down multiple times for maximum precision
        The slide rails can be welded up and reshaped to achieve the same effect
        >The front strap part of the frame has been checkered to make it dig into the hand. That prevents any slipping
        Common modification. I personally don't care for it, but a lot of people like it.
        >The sight system's original too. It's a 3-dot type. It's got an enlarged front sight, giving it superior target sighting capability.
        It's better than GI sights.
        >The regular hammer's been replaced with a ring hammer. That enhances the wienering control and increases the hammer-down speed
        The only real reason to replace a spur with a Rowel hammer is if you change the grip safety to an upswept beavertail. The spur is actually much easier to manipulate. The hammer speed refers to lock time (the time between the trigger being pulled and the gun firing) and a lighter hammer WILL decrease lock time, but only marginally. It only makes a difference at top level competition
        >They also reworked the grip safety to accommodate the ring hammer. It looks like they eliminated it altogether. This is a tool for pros.
        Again, the rowel hammer accommodates an upswept grip safety, not the other way around. The grip safety isn't strictly necessary, but there's also no reason to remove its functionality.
        (con't)

        My brudda from anodah mudda. Good effortposts.

        [...]
        [...]
        Sometimes, autism is just beautiful to behold. Do you have trouble telling faces apart?

        Beautiful innit?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      (con't)
      >The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling.
      Extended safety levers are still common and quite popular. The original safety lever is kind of small and stubby. Extended slide stops were a popular mod in the 60s and 70s, but they fell out of favor because the added mass of the longer lever could cause the slide stop to lock the slide back prematurely due to inertia
      >The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip
      Undercut trigger guards are a popular feature due to newer shooting methods encouraging as high a grip as possible
      >and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
      A longer trigger makes finger access harder, not easier. The 1911 A1 shortened the trigger to make it easier for people with smaller hands. The long trigger came back into fashion as people moved to two-handed shooting and the adjusted grip made the short trigger feel too short
      >The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal
      Common trigger job. 3.5 is a competition trigger, most people wouldn't go below 4.5 for a duty/defense handgun
      >The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine
      Beveled mag wells are basically standard these days. Generally a good addition
      >The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake
      Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
      >The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing
      Mainspring housing shape is just a preference thing. Flat ones are more popular these days due to the modern two-handed grip, but the A1 added an arch to raise the natural point of aim when point shooting. The checkering/serrations were pretty much always standard, so not really worth mentioning

      (con't)

      [...]
      (con't)
      >On top of that, they added wienering serrations to the top part of the slide. That lets you load and eject cartridges faster in an emergency.
      Not really. The forward wienering serrations were originally added to aid in press checks (checking to see that a round is chambered) but those aren't really done anymore outside of competition
      >Whoever did this is a professional, no question. This thing could shoot a one-hole at 25 yards in a machine rest
      Many of these would require a pro gunsmith, but the slide-frame fit has very little to do with the overall accuracy of a 1911. The barrel-slide-bushing fit and barrel-slide stop fit is far more important. A tight slide-frame fit might decrease a group 1/4" at 50 yards with match ammo, but with 230gr ball, it wouldn't make a difference.

      All that being said, Snake doesn't have the internet, so any knowledge he has about guns would have to come from manuals, periodicals, or anecdotes, so he can't be blamed for believing some of the fuddlore or incorrect nomenclature he spouts

      Sometimes, autism is just beautiful to behold. Do you have trouble telling faces apart?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      (con't)
      >The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling.
      Extended safety levers are still common and quite popular. The original safety lever is kind of small and stubby. Extended slide stops were a popular mod in the 60s and 70s, but they fell out of favor because the added mass of the longer lever could cause the slide stop to lock the slide back prematurely due to inertia
      >The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip
      Undercut trigger guards are a popular feature due to newer shooting methods encouraging as high a grip as possible
      >and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
      A longer trigger makes finger access harder, not easier. The 1911 A1 shortened the trigger to make it easier for people with smaller hands. The long trigger came back into fashion as people moved to two-handed shooting and the adjusted grip made the short trigger feel too short
      >The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal
      Common trigger job. 3.5 is a competition trigger, most people wouldn't go below 4.5 for a duty/defense handgun
      >The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine
      Beveled mag wells are basically standard these days. Generally a good addition
      >The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake
      Never a thing. Mag release buttons have actually gotten bigger to make them easier to hit under pressure.
      >The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing
      Mainspring housing shape is just a preference thing. Flat ones are more popular these days due to the modern two-handed grip, but the A1 added an arch to raise the natural point of aim when point shooting. The checkering/serrations were pretty much always standard, so not really worth mentioning

      (con't)

      [...]
      (con't)
      >On top of that, they added wienering serrations to the top part of the slide. That lets you load and eject cartridges faster in an emergency.
      Not really. The forward wienering serrations were originally added to aid in press checks (checking to see that a round is chambered) but those aren't really done anymore outside of competition
      >Whoever did this is a professional, no question. This thing could shoot a one-hole at 25 yards in a machine rest
      Many of these would require a pro gunsmith, but the slide-frame fit has very little to do with the overall accuracy of a 1911. The barrel-slide-bushing fit and barrel-slide stop fit is far more important. A tight slide-frame fit might decrease a group 1/4" at 50 yards with match ammo, but with 230gr ball, it wouldn't make a difference.

      All that being said, Snake doesn't have the internet, so any knowledge he has about guns would have to come from manuals, periodicals, or anecdotes, so he can't be blamed for believing some of the fuddlore or incorrect nomenclature he spouts

      Let's not forget that this was set in the 60s so all of that customization would have been quite impressive to your average boomer.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/VrpBX8J.jpeg

      >First of all, the feeding ramp is polished to a mirror sheen. It's not going to have any feeding problems. The slide's been replaced with a reinforced version, and it meshes perfectly with the frame. The frame itself has been iron-welded and scraped down multiple times for maximum precision. The front strap part of the frame has been checkered to make it dig into the hand. That prevents any slipping. The sight system's original too. It's a 3-dot type. It's got an enlarged front sight, giving it superior target sighting capability. The regular hammer's been replaced with a ring hammer. That enhances the wienering control and increases the hammer-down speed. They also reworked the grip safety to accommodate the ring hammer. It looks like they eliminated it altogether. This is a tool for pros. The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling. The base of the trigger guard is whittled down so you can use a high grip, and the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access. The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds. that's about a pound and a half lighter than normal. The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine. The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake. The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing. On top of that, they added wienering serrations to the top part of the slide. That lets you load and eject cartridges faster in an emergency. Whoever did this is a professional, no question. This thing could shoot a one-hole at 25 yards in a machine rest.
      How good is the gun he is describing?

      the game is just making a quasi 60s MEU
      but most of that is an evolution of custom 1911s from armend swenson, jim clark, jim hoag etc
      most rear sight mods were adjustable S&W rear revolver bo-mars
      in the 60s a few of these things would be off
      a lot of times people just started with goldcup 1911s
      they wouldnt just fit the frame to slide a lot of gunsmiths experimented with welding in and cutting extra lugs for the barrel and slide to lock up
      checkering had to be done by custom made machines or by hand and usually would cover the entire length and radius up to where the trigger gaurd starts, one guy simply took a punch and punched metal burr marks into the grip

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I could also swear I saw a picture of a Vietnam era 1911 with tape securing the grip safety so that it was always disengaged.
        Thanks to google sucking ass and link rot I may not ever find it again.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Reinforced slide
      >Never heard of it.
      Typically original WW2 M1911 slides were hardened on front of the slide and the slide stop notch when rebuilt as those were typical cracking points in the original slides. See slight darker tones around those areas here.
      Later slides were fully reinforced, like the IMI contract slides

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Go back to bed, Ocelot.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >iron-welded and scraped down multiple times
    What the frick does this even mean? I’ve never heard of “iron-welding” and I’m a machinist, we don’t “scrape down” shit.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Huh?

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >average 1911 shill explaining how little work is required to make much stopping powah fuddy five better than your mattel toy pistol

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Set in an alt history 60s, its very appropriate and realistic for snake to gush about finding a fricking gun like that in his time period.

    It's the same energy as taking a current day modern custom holy frick you money handgun and plopping it in WW2 on the allies side elite paratrooper who's a gun nerd. You'd lose your shit. As for description, it's all modifications and advanced quality control obsessed gunsmithing from today for custom guns

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >slide's been replaced with a reinforced version, and it meshes perfectly with the frame
    >The front strap part of the frame has been checkered to make it dig into the hand
    >The sight system's original too. It's a 3-dot type
    >It's got an enlarged front sight
    >the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
    >The trigger pull is about 3.5 pounds
    >The mainspring housing has been changed to a flat type to increase grip, and it's even been fitted with stepping so that it won't slip from the recoil when firing
    I like. My M1911A1 has/will soon have similar modifications. Front Pachmayr grip wraps around instead of a frame checkering.

    >The thumb safety and slide stop are extended for precise handling
    >the trigger itself is a long type for easy finger access
    >The magazine well has been widened to make it easier to put in a new magazine
    >they added wienering serrations to the top part of the slide
    Up to personal taste. Extended slide stops are neat I guess, but not too necessary for carrying. I wouldn't care for an extended thumb safety. Larger magazine well makes a wider gun, which I don't like.

    >feeding ramp is polished to a mirror sheen
    >The frame itself has been iron-welded and scraped down multiple times for maximum precision
    I dunno

    >The regular hammer's been replaced with a ring hammer. That enhances the wienering control and increases the hammer-down speed
    >They also reworked the grip safety to accommodate the ring hammer. It looks like they eliminated it altogether
    >The base of the trigger guard is whittled down
    >The magazine catch button has been filed down low to make it harder to hit it by mistake
    Not my taste. I prefer a solid hammer, but a shorter one. I still like grip safety. I have an extended magazine catch button which works well with my Pachmayr grips, but I'd say it's unnecessary. A shorter one would be bad I'd say. I've never hit it by mistake, even though I sometimes I worry about it.

    Altogether, pretty solid mods

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it sounded cool as a kid, now it feels cringe considering it's jibberish

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      its almost the same description as pic

      https://i.imgur.com/6wBLpnw.jpeg

      [...]
      the game is just making a quasi 60s MEU
      but most of that is an evolution of custom 1911s from armend swenson, jim clark, jim hoag etc
      most rear sight mods were adjustable S&W rear revolver bo-mars
      in the 60s a few of these things would be off
      a lot of times people just started with goldcup 1911s
      they wouldnt just fit the frame to slide a lot of gunsmiths experimented with welding in and cutting extra lugs for the barrel and slide to lock up
      checkering had to be done by custom made machines or by hand and usually would cover the entire length and radius up to where the trigger gaurd starts, one guy simply took a punch and punched metal burr marks into the grip

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Revolver Ocelot

    Revolver Ocelot

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