Family military history & stories?

I don't have much, My grandpa was a soldier in the Iraqi army fighting in Iran, he was captured very early on and spent 9 years in a POW camp :/ my uncle also fought in the war although briefly.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My grandpa ran over an Italian in a tank destroyer in WW2. Also was half Injun and Germans would walk up to him after the war and ask if he hunted buffalo and funny shit like that. His brother was a B17 pilot and got shrapnel in his ass. Great grandpa on the other side had a cool story about mortaring a bunch of coconut trees that they thought Japanese snipers were hiding in. Uncle fought in Afghanistan and won't talk much about it but now thinks Islam is a ponzi scheme. My paternal grandpa fought in Korea and also doesn't talk much about it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also my great grandpa on the other side fought in the 442nd which was an all Japanese-American segregated unit.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >veterans of the Iran-Iraq War are old enough to be grandfathers

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      He was born in 1949, the age group of many of the veterans, is your mindset stuck in like 1995?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >is your mindset stuck in like 1995?

        Nah, I just feel old because I was born the year that the war ended (mom and her family fled Iran because of the war so it has some personal meaning to me).

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Veterans of the Battle of Fallujah are old enough to be grandfathers (I know one, he had a 5-year old when he went over there, and now has 2 grandkids).

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Great-Grandfather was in WWI and fought in the battle of jutland for the British. Wish I knew more about them in the 19th century, Off topic but what is furthest you can trace your ancestors back, mine is the early 1800s

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Jutland

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Late 1300s for my mom's family, 1100s for my dad's side. Cool fact, Reynald de Chatillon was a cousin, he was personally executed by Saladin for being an butthole and is also regarded as being the main driving force behind the collapse of the Christian Kingdom of Jerusalem.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1000-1100 sometime is the earliest record i have.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1600's colonists. Stories about them getting attack by indian slavers are in the family.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1066 on my mom’s side. Oldest namesake was reported to fight at Hastings under William the Conqueror and was given a manor in Kent for distinguished service.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      17th century, I know for certain that on my Mum’s side I’m a direct descendant of Oliver Cromwell. Which isn’t great but there’s worse people to be descended from.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Got one branch of the family where some guy in the 1800s had a bullshit family tree that traced his lineage back to Adam
      On another branch, we were able to go all the way back to some Norwegian king who was listed in Heimskringla, so I can trace it back to Freyr
      I'm literally a demigod

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I'm literally a demigod
        By now, most people are. Pagan gods couldn't keep it in their pants/togas/tunics.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Like 1930. American. Pure Polish though. My great-grandfather was a mysterious guy. Left wife and kid behind in Poland. We suspect it was because of some crime. Became a coal miner in West Virginia. Had basically no relationship with my grandfather except demands and coal-mining. Would only call him "boy." One day as they were mining coal, my grandfather, a teenager at the time, snapped back with "my name is Nick." Apparently their relationship sort of grew after that. The estranged kid from Poland tracked my great-grandfather down to the very rural coal mine and tried to kill him - ended up joining him in the mining business and moving to Chicago. My grandmother's side is the same thing - probably criminals, so we don't know. It sucks, because I'm really into geneology/family history. Any ideas on how to expand on this? Grandparents are both alive but 90+. Will draft them a letter now.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Isn't this just the plot to there will be blood?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Off topic but what is furthest you can trace your ancestors back, mine is the early 1800s
      Same, early-mid 1800s. My mom's side is all Irish who came over during/after the potato famine. Dad's side Polish/Russian peasant trash who came through Ellis island in the 1890s. No idea about any family history prior to coming to America.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grand grandad was in the italian army first in Africa, then in the 8th army in Russia

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Grand grandad was in the italian army first in Africa, then in the 8th army in Russia
      damn, he was very lucky to survive (assuming he did)

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    not military per se but my great great uncle was a doctor during ww2. he was allowed to be a doctor even after the germs captured the entire country so naturally he used that to his advantage in the resistance and poisoned a bunch of gestapo officers. unfortunately he eventually got caught and was offered to be acquitted in exchange for cooperation. he refused and you can guess what happened with him.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My grandpa was a Panzer gunner at Kursk. Went into Russian imprisonment for like ten years, never much talked about it

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    One grandfather was on the USS Pipefish, which mostly did lifeguard duty. He distilled alcohol from torpedo fuel. The other was a Seabee and on Okinawa during the typhoon
    Ancestors fought for the CSA
    Ancestors fought against the British in the revolution
    Ancestors fought against Cromwell and got shipped to Georgia

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Got a few:
    Had a number of ancestors fight on both sides during the American Revolution, and in the American Civil War. The only story from this far back is from the Civil War, one of my many great uncles had enlisted in the Confederate army, but he was really short, somewhere between 4 and 5 feet tall when he was an adult. The story goes he was in formation for review by General Jackson, and when Jackson rode past, he saw my uncle and thought he was a little kid. Jackson stopped his horse, and refused to believe my uncle's Sargeant that he was really an adult, and made my uncle remove his hat and pull on his beard to prove it was real. Jackson then stated that he was surely the shortest man in the entire confederate army, and likely in any army in the world. At least that is the story the old people handed down. More recently, my great great uncle on my mom's side was in ww1, killed a german by crushing his face with a rock in a trench raid, then got gassed somewhere in France. Family said he never smiled again after he got home from the war, not because he was traumatized, but because his face was mostly paralyzed. He had seizures too. We assume it was nerve damage from phosgene or something like that, or maybe he was exposed to some sort of early nerve agent. He died in early 50s, but was an all around solid dude according to the family.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Both my grandfathers were in ww2, one in europe and one in japan. Mom's dad was older and enlisted in 42, spent the war in tanks in europe under Patton. He had 19 tanks and tank destroyers destroyed under/around him, and was sole survivor of 14 of these. Not sure if he was lucky or cursed. After the war, he had his own bedroom that was locked at night, or else he would get up and try to kill grandma in his sleep. Stayed in the army his whole life. Commanded tanks in Korea, then died of a heart attack right before he got sent to Vietnam. Never talked about it, but we assume he either really liked killing or wanted to die, or maybe both, since he always sought combat deployments the second there was a war to go to.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Other grandfather was younger, enlisted in late 44, and completed MP training just in time to occupy Nagasaki. Was in the first wave of guys there, saw some fricked up shit in the aftermath of the bomb, and ended up being rather sympathetic towards the defeated Japanese. He was from an old confederate family from Mississippi, who still had very strong sentiments about decorum and behavior, a holdover from being plantation owners descended from French knights. He was responsible for weapons turn ins, and was the only enlisted man who saluted Japanese officers when they turned in their swords. A Japanese equivalent to a colonel saw this, cut through the line of other Japanese officers, returned my grandfather's salute, then bowed and presented him his pair of swords. Grandfather thought this was cool, claimed the swords as his war trophies, and took them home to East Tennessee. Grandfather died when he was about 38, but looked like he was about 80 at the time, everyone assumes it was from radiation exposure in Nagasaki. The swords then sat in a closet until the late 90s, when my dad got the from his mom, and did some research, turns out they were Sengoku era samurai swords from about 1480, made by a smith named Masahiro Fujiwara, who was famous enough in his own times that Japanese smiths 200 years later were using his name as a trade mark indicating quality.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That grandfather's (future) brother in law, my great uncle, was in the army and fought in North Africa and Italy. He was in England on his way there, and spent a couple weeks chilling in London before going to Africa. The night before he shipped out, he got wasted with a friend and three British girls, who convinced the two of them to come back to their house after bars closed. It was way out in the country, cab dropped them off, they spent the rest of the night drinking and taking turns on all three girls. Next morning, he wakes up, still drunk, to find he's miles from where he was supposed to be, no phone in the house to call a cab, and he is about to miss the ship and get hit with desertion charges. He and his buddy run four miles to the nearest little town, a pair of bobbies try to arrest them for disorderly conduct and public drunkenness, they beat the hell out of the bobbies, steal their bicycles, and make it back just in time to get on the ship. Once he got to Africa, he spent most of his time repairing tank engines, and saw a little combat. He fought against Germans, Vichy French, and their Arab auxiliaries, and bitterly hated all three groups until the day he died. He participated in the invasion of Italy, and added Italians to his growing list of people he hated, and was field promoted to sgt at the wise old age of 19 due to casualties. When they were in Pisa, on his 20th birthday, he and his buddies decided to go see the leaning tower. There was an Italian policeman there who tried to stop them from going in, so my uncle wienered his Thompson submachine gun, pointed it at the policeman, and began counting down from 10 in Italian. When he got to 6, the policeman put his hands up and ran away. They went into the tower, climbed up to the top, and decided to ring the bell. There was no rope to ring it with, so they took turns blasting the bell with the Thompson to make it ring until they got bored and decided to go loot some booze from the locals.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The MP grandfather had a sister, she flew corsairs and later p38s from the factory to the bases in California to go to the pacific theater. She and the other girls would fly the planes out, spend the night in San Diego or LA (I don't remember which one she said it was) then get a bus back to the factory the next day. The fighter planes didn't have enough room in the wienerpit to take anything with them other than their parachutes and a few small items that would fit in a pocket, but they realized that the cells in the wings where ammo for the machine guns would go were empty. She said they wpuld each pack a wienertail dress, underwear, stocking, and a single heel in one wing, and a clutch purse, makeup, a nice bra, and the other heel in the other wing. They all changed when they landed, then spent the night partying with sailors and marines on shore leave. After the war she married the uncle who shot the bell.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I also have an uncle who was in intelligence during desert storm and later rode around on Airforce One with the president, but he's not allowed to tell us details about what he did. He did once say he was responsible for a briefcase, so we assume he carried the nuclear football, or maybe it was just full of cash to give foreign officials.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Even fighters had small luggage compartments.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, I'm not sure why they put stuff in the wings, maybe they weren't supposed to take personal items and were smuggling them. She never said, and she passed in '01 so I can't really ask her.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              this is really cool. the corsair was no joke to fly. getting dicked down by an entire marine battalion on shore leave was probably pretty intense too

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Wouldn't dream of telling your family their business, but have they ever considered tracking down that Colonel's family and returning his swords to them? It would likely mean a hell of a lot.

          That grandfather's (future) brother in law, my great uncle, was in the army and fought in North Africa and Italy. He was in England on his way there, and spent a couple weeks chilling in London before going to Africa. The night before he shipped out, he got wasted with a friend and three British girls, who convinced the two of them to come back to their house after bars closed. It was way out in the country, cab dropped them off, they spent the rest of the night drinking and taking turns on all three girls. Next morning, he wakes up, still drunk, to find he's miles from where he was supposed to be, no phone in the house to call a cab, and he is about to miss the ship and get hit with desertion charges. He and his buddy run four miles to the nearest little town, a pair of bobbies try to arrest them for disorderly conduct and public drunkenness, they beat the hell out of the bobbies, steal their bicycles, and make it back just in time to get on the ship. Once he got to Africa, he spent most of his time repairing tank engines, and saw a little combat. He fought against Germans, Vichy French, and their Arab auxiliaries, and bitterly hated all three groups until the day he died. He participated in the invasion of Italy, and added Italians to his growing list of people he hated, and was field promoted to sgt at the wise old age of 19 due to casualties. When they were in Pisa, on his 20th birthday, he and his buddies decided to go see the leaning tower. There was an Italian policeman there who tried to stop them from going in, so my uncle wienered his Thompson submachine gun, pointed it at the policeman, and began counting down from 10 in Italian. When he got to 6, the policeman put his hands up and ran away. They went into the tower, climbed up to the top, and decided to ring the bell. There was no rope to ring it with, so they took turns blasting the bell with the Thompson to make it ring until they got bored and decided to go loot some booze from the locals.

          From what I can tell, everyone who fought French traitors hated their fricking guts.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They were earned and are now part of OPs heritage. They're also a nice chunk of change.

            My father fought in the ETO (Army) and I grew up around many WWII vets who were still in the workforce. Like most G.I.s they scrounged aggressively and brought back (which was encouraged) rifles, pistols, knives and swords.

            The way to honor real G.I.s would be to turn a profit on what they scored if not retained for family (who will eventually sell the stuff off in some future generation). My Korea vet mentorbro (we did antique car flea markets together) said he souvenired all sorts of Jap leftovers while caving on Okinawa to include a couple of skulls left to bleach on their barracks roof, cameras and other shit that missed destruction.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >The only story from this far back is from the Civil War, one of my many great uncles had enlisted in the Confederate army, but he was really short, somewhere between 4 and 5 feet tall when he was an adult. The story goes he was in formation for review by General Jackson, and when Jackson rode past, he saw my uncle and thought he was a little kid. Jackson stopped his horse, and refused to believe my uncle's Sargeant that he was really an adult, and made my uncle remove his hat and pull on his beard to prove it was real. Jackson then stated that he was surely the shortest man in the entire confederate army, and likely in any army in the world.

      Stonewall Jackson was like 6 feet tall so the height difference must've been comical to look at.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Both my grandfathers were in ww2, one in europe and one in japan. Mom's dad was older and enlisted in 42, spent the war in tanks in europe under Patton. He had 19 tanks and tank destroyers destroyed under/around him, and was sole survivor of 14 of these. Not sure if he was lucky or cursed. After the war, he had his own bedroom that was locked at night, or else he would get up and try to kill grandma in his sleep. Stayed in the army his whole life. Commanded tanks in Korea, then died of a heart attack right before he got sent to Vietnam. Never talked about it, but we assume he either really liked killing or wanted to die, or maybe both, since he always sought combat deployments the second there was a war to go to.

      Other grandfather was younger, enlisted in late 44, and completed MP training just in time to occupy Nagasaki. Was in the first wave of guys there, saw some fricked up shit in the aftermath of the bomb, and ended up being rather sympathetic towards the defeated Japanese. He was from an old confederate family from Mississippi, who still had very strong sentiments about decorum and behavior, a holdover from being plantation owners descended from French knights. He was responsible for weapons turn ins, and was the only enlisted man who saluted Japanese officers when they turned in their swords. A Japanese equivalent to a colonel saw this, cut through the line of other Japanese officers, returned my grandfather's salute, then bowed and presented him his pair of swords. Grandfather thought this was cool, claimed the swords as his war trophies, and took them home to East Tennessee. Grandfather died when he was about 38, but looked like he was about 80 at the time, everyone assumes it was from radiation exposure in Nagasaki. The swords then sat in a closet until the late 90s, when my dad got the from his mom, and did some research, turns out they were Sengoku era samurai swords from about 1480, made by a smith named Masahiro Fujiwara, who was famous enough in his own times that Japanese smiths 200 years later were using his name as a trade mark indicating quality.

      That grandfather's (future) brother in law, my great uncle, was in the army and fought in North Africa and Italy. He was in England on his way there, and spent a couple weeks chilling in London before going to Africa. The night before he shipped out, he got wasted with a friend and three British girls, who convinced the two of them to come back to their house after bars closed. It was way out in the country, cab dropped them off, they spent the rest of the night drinking and taking turns on all three girls. Next morning, he wakes up, still drunk, to find he's miles from where he was supposed to be, no phone in the house to call a cab, and he is about to miss the ship and get hit with desertion charges. He and his buddy run four miles to the nearest little town, a pair of bobbies try to arrest them for disorderly conduct and public drunkenness, they beat the hell out of the bobbies, steal their bicycles, and make it back just in time to get on the ship. Once he got to Africa, he spent most of his time repairing tank engines, and saw a little combat. He fought against Germans, Vichy French, and their Arab auxiliaries, and bitterly hated all three groups until the day he died. He participated in the invasion of Italy, and added Italians to his growing list of people he hated, and was field promoted to sgt at the wise old age of 19 due to casualties. When they were in Pisa, on his 20th birthday, he and his buddies decided to go see the leaning tower. There was an Italian policeman there who tried to stop them from going in, so my uncle wienered his Thompson submachine gun, pointed it at the policeman, and began counting down from 10 in Italian. When he got to 6, the policeman put his hands up and ran away. They went into the tower, climbed up to the top, and decided to ring the bell. There was no rope to ring it with, so they took turns blasting the bell with the Thompson to make it ring until they got bored and decided to go loot some booze from the locals.

      Wouldn't dream of telling your family their business, but have they ever considered tracking down that Colonel's family and returning his swords to them? It would likely mean a hell of a lot.
      [...]
      From what I can tell, everyone who fought French traitors hated their fricking guts.

      You posted this exact shit in the last family military history thread like, 2 or 3 months ago

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I didnt see it so its new to me

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yep. I have it all saved and formatted to post whenever one of these threads comes up. I like sharing the stories with other people.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Oh, and the reason I keep posting the same stories is because they haven't changed, and are still my family's war stories. I like to tell the stories because it helps me remember my family. Sorry I don't have new stories for you, everyone in my family who was in a war is dead now.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yep. I have it all saved and formatted to post whenever one of these threads comes up. I like sharing the stories with other people.

          ...fair enough, they are interesting stories indeed

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        His family history probably didn't change between then and now, so that makes sense.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My great grandfather was in WW1, was eating a pear in a pear tree when he was shot in the leg by a German sniper.
    Sent home and became a fireman.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My mother says that her uncle was a weird one. She remembers that he had a lot of radios and apparently he left for quite a while to Nicaragua during the wars with the Contras. He came back but quickly embarked somewhere else, they don't know anything else about him

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Going backwards in time.

    Mom
    >Aero engine tech in the RCAF for 20 years ('75-'95).

    Dad
    >RCN Radio operator and then later a technician for 12 years. (1980-1992)
    >Released, went to seminary, became an ordained Anglican priest, rejoined the RCN as a Chaplain for another 21 years. (1997-2018)

    Maternal grandfather
    >Manned a shore battery in Halifax during WW2

    Paternal Grandfather
    >Merchant Marine doing convoys during WW2

    Maternal Great Uncle
    >WW1 Infantry with the Canadian Corps
    >Killed in arras in September 1918 at age 18 after two years in the trenches

    Maternal Great-grandfather
    >WW1 with the Canadians Expeditionary Force, went over in 1915. Don't know of any stories - he died in the 1960s.

    Paternal Great Grandfather
    >Gunner on HMS ROMEO during WW1
    >One of only 2 survivors after it got torpedoed
    >Was present in Halifax aboard HMCS Niobe for the Halifax explosion

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Since you posted Truman, I'll have to give my story, minor though it is. My grandfather had graduated paratrooper school in mid-1945 and was set to deploy in the first wave of the planned invasion of mainland Japan. In all likelihood, my entire family would not exist if such an invasion were to go through, so even though I don't admire President Truman, I am forced to respect him for giving the Japs the ol' atomic One-Two and making sure no Americans had to die. I know it's not an exciting story of veteran service, but it's all I got.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My grandad was a wanted SS man for executing eastern yuropeons. He fled to South America and eventually ended up in America. I still have the Mauser 1912 he apparently did most of his work with. I probably have the highest body count weapon on this board and it’s a .25 auto.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Have you posted this before? I remember reading something here like a month ago about some SS officer personally executing a shit ton of slavs with a .25 handgun. Did he like to wear gloves while doing the deed?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You're thinking of the Soviet executioner who wore a leather apron and long leather gloves to keep clean. He had a bunch of .25 cal pistols, Walthers, as I recall. He liked the German guns as they were more reliable than the Russian ones, which I guess is important when you are shooting dozens of men each day.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What was his name?

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Great uncle on my mothers side lost half a hand fighting the commies at Narva amongst other injuries
    My grandfather on my mothers side was a medical orderly with the belgian UN troops in Korea
    grandfather on my fathers side was enlisted into the army as a teen to teach him some disciple. He deserted shortly afterwards not liking army life but being a minor they couldn't jail him for desertion.
    there a decent chunk of Prussian in me from my mothers side so there should be some more there. But the family developed a very sudden case of amnesia to all things german right about lat summer early fall 44

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    In 1944 my father went to war.
    He opened the door and pissed on the floor
    and that was the end of the war.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Great grandfather was a nazi soldier lol it's true no idea what he did we gave no detailed records

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Here's s photo of him

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Hope he had a good life with the wife

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My great grandad was in the Arab Intelligence Bureau with Lawrence of Arabia, and we think he was a spy during the second world war because he spent a lot of time in Portugal and could speak German (Portugal was a popular tourist spot for German soldiers on leave). He got some high French civilian award after he hosted the French President and King George V at Covent Garden in 1938 (he was the manager there)

    Grandad missed out on WW2 by like two weeks or something, but he was in one of the first RAF squadrons to modernise into the Meteor.

    Dad used to sit on the defence committee of the house of clarks and flew over Iraqi airspace during the gulf war, and one of their fighter escorts got a missile lock. He also went to a Christmas party in the pentagon and oversaw some of the processes involved in the Eurofighter coming online (he didn't do anything he just helped push the papers for the MPs).

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    German side of the senpai did crazy shit. Grandpa had 3 middle names for uncles who died on the Eastern front. One of them (Manfred) joined the waffen-SS early on, based on the stories passed down he was most likely in the 3rd SS panzer division. The other two were just infantry and died in Stalingrad. Another great-grand uncle got captured at Kursk and spent 7 years in Siberia. Only other notable guy on that side was an airplane mechanic who got conscripted into the volksturm (before quickly surrendering to the Americans).

    Other side is Japanese, but the came to the US in the late 1800s so unfortunately no turbo based kamikaze pilots. Everyone got interned and my great-uncles taught US intelligence officers Japanese for the duration.

    Grandpa on the Japanese side was a medic who, as I understand it, was a surgeon for the USAF in vietnam. He didn't do any heroics but he got some medals that grandma keeps in the closet. He had a huge bookshelf with a bunch of medical books. When I was younger (and he was alive), he told me some pretty gory stories about operating on GIs.

    His older brother served in the 442nd and got shrapnel in the ass during the Anzio campaign.

    His younger brother (still alive) was a pilot for the USAF. He flew C-130s. His best story is how he would fly spooks around the middle east: sometimes they would have a tent in the hold that had anonymous people inside, other times they would have him do orbits over the mediterranean at 5000 feet while they dumped shit out the back.

    >Back to the german side>
    Dad got conscripted into the east german military. he was an antitank misselier and hated it. He says they did a lot of manual labor, unironically in the coal mines. He snuck vodka into the barracks in peach jars and spent 3 days in prison at the end of his service for discipline.
    Uncle got conscripted too and was in a motorized div. I got a picture of him looking drippy af next to some sort of AFV which I'd love for yall to ID. lmk if yall want it

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Post it anon, we'd love to see/help. Here's my granddad as a fresh butterbar (foreground, right adjacent of the LTC) with his commander and their mobile staff office.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My Icelandic great grandpa was a ship stoker for the Canadian merchant navy
    One of my grand uncles who immigrated from Ireland fought in WW1 for most of the war, but eventually lost his arm to a German machine gun. Came back home and shortly after married some Swedish lady

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grandpa got shot in nam because he was told if he retreated into Cambodia there would be millions of lives lost in another war. meanwhile we were running ops there the same month.
    My uncle was a medic In Korea he ate dog
    Pic unrelated

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Oh and my two uncles dad side he's 73 joined for citizenship even changed their names (half German half Russian so yeah) came to the US in 51 ironically got sent back to Germany although they were born Austria.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >be uncle on NATO mission in Yugoslavia
    >assigned to locate and blow up weapons caches
    >get intel of a cache in the basement of a large machine shop
    >supposedly unguarded
    >stack up and breach
    >bad intel, it’s very much guarded
    >uncle personally killed 5ish Serb irregulars
    >weapons cache was one of the largest in that area
    >accidentally ruined uncle’s Christmas by prying this story out of him

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also
      >discover a 400 meter long trench stacked 10 feet deep with bodies
      >Serbs liquidated the village hours before peacekeepers showed up

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        and then they b***h about how unfair it is that NATO let the Bosnians get a bit off land simply letting the serbs leave

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also
      >discover a 400 meter long trench stacked 10 feet deep with bodies
      >Serbs liquidated the village hours before peacekeepers showed up

      I've seen a post like this in a screencap before.

      Are you the same anon who recounted a story where a relative in the British Army in Bosnia in 1992-3 had to winch a dozen bodies out of a well after muslim militias beheaded everyone? I can't find the post in the archive but I remember the anon saying they had to lay out the bodies on the grass and try to match up the heads and it was impossible to ID most of them because they had been rotting for days in well water.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Different anon

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My Great-Grandpa. From what I've been told he died in Ukraine in 1943. Apparently he got leave shortly before his death and basically said goodbye to his wife and ķids since he seemed sure that he wouldn't make it out alive.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I know little to nothing about my other great grandfathers. Once when we moved, my mother and I found this little form fanilies of POWs got from one of them. From that I learned that he was a pioneer and got captured in the West in 1945. He was then sent to a POW camp near Brest, were he spent about a year before being released. He was a carpenter and carved an art piece to remember his time as a prisoner, I'll post it if I find a photo.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >he is even sporting the stereotypical undercut
      Why was German fashion so ahead of its time?

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Thirty Years War, American Revolution, War of 1812, Civil War, WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam.
    Only ones I know much about are:
    Paternal Uncle
    >USMC MP, never went to Vietnam, spent the war breaking up bar fights and writing speeding tickets in California and Okinawa.
    Maternal Grandfather
    >Big guy, not a nice fellow, started smoking at 9, took 6 cops to dogpile and arrest him at 13, used to chase down and catch rabbits on foot to impress girls. Drafted into Korea. Light machinegun. Week after Pork Chop Hill some Chinaman wiped his crew with a grenade, took a bunch of shrapnel in the back, spent 8 months in a military hospital. Went AWOL for a while. Came home more mentally fricked than when he left. Molested and beat his kids. Didn't talk about war. Refused to eat rice for the last 50 years of his life because asiatics shit in the rice fields.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grandpa was a guerilla fighter in the Indonesian Army back in the War for Independence Era (1945-1949). He didnt tell any war stories beside that one time a p-40 kittyhawk shredded his friend and imobilize the other

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ik willen zeggen tegen je grootvader dat hij beter wat opgeschoven had om met zijn vriend mee te gaan, maar ik praat niet met kakerlakken.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      womp womp try again.
      love it when londo loses their money

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grandpa on my dad’s side was unequivocally based.
    >high school drop out
    >joined the Air Force, served in Korea loading ordinance onto planes, apparently also “Genie Rockets” in case the Cold War went nuclear
    >transfers to coast guard after a while
    >goes to Vietnam as a coastie somehow, he never talked about it to me but all his buddies I met before they all got old say he was a hero for some of the things he did
    >gets out of Vietnam, stays in coast guard for a while, retires after his 20 years
    >work as department of energy security guard at nuclear power plant for several years
    >assembled missiles for Martin-Marietta
    >eventually became a mail man out of boredom and finally retired for good once he started having grandkids
    I miss the old man. He had a shit load of complications later in life, apparently he was all over where they sprayed that Agent Orange shit, and spent the last few years fighting the VA to acknowledge it. Diabetes, 2 types of cancers, strokes, blood coagulation issues. Nasty shit.
    I choose to remember him in a good light, and leave you with a pic I like of him from Osan, Korea sometime in the Late 1950’s.

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Great granddad was in the AK and fought in the Warsaw Uprising. I think my great grandma was a courier there but I'm not 100% certain.

  27. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Still valid, we've got a neat connection there - my grandfather also fought Iran (under much different circumstances I'll get to next post).
    >TQ
    Mine has an extensive, formative one.
    Father's side:

    Great Uncle
    >Cdr, USN. One of the original "Frogmen" and SCUBA pioneers.
    >Did salvage work on the SS Normandie wreck
    >A bunch of stuff in the Pacific during WW2. Mostly repair jobs but he sure got promoted.

    Grandpa (pictured)
    >EF-10B Pilot, USMC. Deployed with VCMJ-1 to South Vietnam in 1965, flew EWAR sorties supporting strikes up North. He + his plane went MIA in 1967, shortly after my Dad was born.

    Great Uncle
    >Grandpa's older brother
    >B-17 radioman. The war ended before his unit deployed, he spent the late 1940s flying around South America, liaison and goodwill stuff. Spent decades riding his Harley-Davidson across the country to POW-MIA rallies, even in his 80s.

    Father
    >USAF, ANG
    >A-10 pilot, mostly in S. Korea. Went commercial, then 9/11 happened and he got back in. 104th FS, Iraq 2007-08 (first A-10C operations), Afghanistan 2011-12.

    Me
    >Told in harshest possible terms by both prior generations not to sign my life away.
    >Went Alaskan instead.

  28. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mother's side:

    Grandpa
    >Green Beret, 10th SFG
    >West Germany
    >2 tours in Vietnam, 1967-69 and 1970-72. 1st on Phu Quoc Island, 2nd unknown.
    >2-4 years in Iran, 77-79 with his family living at the US base. They were evacuated as the revolution made gains, he stayed. Don't know if he was truly on the *last* plane out as my mom tells it, but close enough that his family saw the embassy/hostage news before knowing if he was safe.
    He rarely talked about it. Mostly the good times, memories of people he knew. I think most of the locals he spent years training, leading - befriending - didn't make it.

    Uncle
    >USAF, T-38 instructor pilot. Now flies for United.

    Uncle
    >Followed his Dad's boot-steps. 90's Army Ranger, GWOT cool guy. Lots of short-notice foreign travel, lots he can't talk about with us for a few more decades. Now semi-retired, master skydiver.
    >Stored his powerboat and motorcycles (fun rides!) at our house and hung out in the basement while on leave. Would watch movies and play games with us kids sometimes, like Ace Combat 04 and Secret Weapons over Normandy.
    >Gave me and my bro his Xbox and Halo CE prior to a long-term deployment.

  29. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My great-granduncle on my father's side was in the Finnish civil war on the White side, took part in executions of Reds but the one thing he's most remembered for in my family was that he fiddled with a pistol in his pocket and shot himself in the thigh, nearly dying from bloodloss as a result. The war was over at that point, dunno if he actually did it to get out of firing squad duties, or if it was a genuine accident.

    His brother, my great-grandfather, missed the Civil War because although he was the older brother, their father guilted him into staying at the family farm to take care of his younger siblings and ailing mother. He tried to get to the front in the Winter War but as a member of the local White Guards he was made responsible for some air defense duties, and missed the war. When the Continuation War began he finally managed to get himself mobilized into the Army, despite being a farmer, a father of four, and in his early fourties. He served in the supply troops, and like two months into the war he was caught in an artillery strike and got his back peppered by shell fragments. That was the end of his war, the doctors never got all of the shrapnel out of him and he was an invalid for the rest of his life, lived to be 90-something.

    My great-grandfather on my mother's side was a medic NCO in the Winter War and Continuation War, said he only ever used his rifle to put down wounded horses, but supposedly he once drunkely admitted to my uncle that he put down at least two badly wounded Soviet POWs, and gave a badly wounded Finnish soldier a pistol knowing that he would use it to kill himself.

  30. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My family is from Nicaragua and my mom would tell me how my uncles had to hide on rooftops or holes in the ground because both Contras and Sandanistas would round up the boys and men in the neighborhood and either forcibly recruit you or kill you. They didn’t like talking about it so that’s all I know. Not war related but still brutal, when she was was crossing through Mexico while pregnant with me she saw someone get chopped up with machetes because they refused to pay the coyotes. I myself have been deployed overseas before but I have yet to see any action. If I ever do I’ll make sure to record it and pass it down to my kids and autists on a Mongolian basket weaving forum lol.

  31. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The only great grandfather I know anything about was a skilled machinist who made artillery during WW1. Worked in different factories on the East Coast after the war, lost everything in the depression except for his Ford. Managed to con his way across the country by shining up the cars of country rubes with gasoline for a quarter, made enough to keep his family alive and gas in the car til they made it to California.

    His son, my paternal grandfather, was in Korea in the infantry. Only story he ever told was that it rained constantly, and they got so sick of it that he and a buddy ended up asking a supporting Sherman to park overtop of them for the night to give them a roof for a few hours. The tank sank in the mud over night and they had to dig their way out.

    My dad was in Vietnam. Said he spent his whole military career on various tenders and Intel boats running out of Subic and Pearl. One time though, he got very drunk and told me a way different story about being an engine man in the brown water navy, burning vils and going rock and roll on VC. I don't know which one is true, and he's getting so old now I don't want to bring it up. I saw him once when we were visiting his second wife's family in the Philippines though, when a couple Philippine army hueys went overhead and he hopped into the bush and started freaking out because he had lost his rifle. Took me a while to calm him down. Same look in his eye that I had seen on a lot of dudes from my own time in the service after some heavy shit happened.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      My maternal grandfather is maybe the funniest one. He was a West Point grad in the 50s, applied to be a fighter pilot but got sidelined into cargo flights. Flew various types of cargo into Central and South America, basically wherever there was a good coup or rebel group to be found. While he was married and respectable back in the states, he was apparently quite the womanizer when on assignment down south. We found this out because he fathered a number of children, who have since moved to the US and taken those genetic tests for the purpose of genealogy. That connected them with my mother, who was happy to find out she had half siblings, but angry that her dad was apparently bending over every latina he could get his hands on in between wienertails and gun running for the company.

  32. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My great uncle was a ping jockey on a ship during WWII when his ship was attacked. Him and a few others were the only ones that died. It was part of a larger battle. But his ship only got hit once and directly on his position in the ship. Really bad luck.

  33. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I had family on both sides of the troubles in Ireland. Real touchy topic even today.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Have you ever brought it up and then watch them fight in the secret hope that it would turn physical? To see in your extended family, in a brawl, who would overpower and rape who? Like just mentioning a car bombing and then your family members start yelling and your uncle lunges at your younger cousin across the table and beats the shit out of them for being a disrespectful little b***h while a melee breaks out between everyone else? And then you hear horrific screams as members of your family start gaining the upper hand on each other, and begin sodomizing them with anything they can find: chair legs, umbrella handles, tv remotes? And it doesn't matter who; there's uncles raping aunts, grandkids raping grandparents, cousins raping cousins, all over a single comment you said. Great grandpa raping his own grandaughter with a broom handle while in his wheelchair. All that primal violence let loose by a single family all at once. Rapists would be getting raped while raping, it would be pure chaos. Nobody would be safe, unless you made sure you were in the dominant position and nobody else, free to rape whatever hole of whatever family member disagreed with you.
      Then when you've had enough laughter, you quietly walk outside and call the police, who burst in and arrest everyone for domestic violence (even to rapees). The rape also wouldn't end in prison, but due to the collective traumatic sodomy experience your family members would probably be the ones doing the raping of other inmates. Of course the hospital bills would be devastating from all the torn veganas and anuses (ani?), leading to further infighting and bad blood, and possibly more rapefights in the future.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Careful, dont cut yourself on that edge

  34. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My grandfather in Hungary worked for the military police. One night he was supposed to be stationed at an outpost and there was an arranged ride for him to take him there. He missed his ride and did not report in that night, and it turned out some Hungarian revolutionaries stormed the place and executed everyone except the captain and his aide.

    Another story my dad told me was once the revolutionaries broke into their home and demanded to see my Grandfather's uniform. When he showed them the blue military police uniform they let him be, but basically anyone they saw with the communist party affiliated uniform they either severely beat them or shot them on the street.

  35. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My family has a really long tradition of service to the United States, but it actually began well before the founding of our country and can be traced back almost a thousand years. One of my favorite stories is that of a direct relative who earned the nickname 'Divulsion' (it may have also actually been his name, we've not really been able to sort that out).

    Long story short, Divulsion was a Major commissioned by the New England Confederation to train and lead troops during King Philip's war, we believe that before this he was an officer with the English regulars who was for whatever reason tasked to support the Confederation. He supported or led various raids, including serving under Governor Josiah Winslow in displacing and massacring the Narragansetts in 1675. However, his most interesting story comes about when he is tasked with leading a detachment to subjugate territory that the Wabanakis held in what is today Maine.

    After leading his unit north a deep winter took hold, and he and his men were forced to entrench a position and withstand Wabanaki siege throughout the winter of 1675 to 1676. This was done on the promise that the New England Confederation would send relief forces to aid my ancestor and help protect settlers in southern Maine. Unfortunately, relief forces never arrived. We don't know exactly how Divulsion and some of his remaining men escaped the siege, but he was able to return south and convince Richard Waldron and Charles Frost to lead a larger expedition north. We don't know exactly what happened to Divulsion at this point, he may have been relieved of duty due to his failures, or he may have been re-assigned to work on the southern front.

    From then he lived about another 30 years, dying in the first decade of the 18th century after having had a bunch of kids and doing unclear things.

    Comically enough, one of his grandchildren served as an officer under Monkton in the French and Indian War and fought in the same part of the world.

  36. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Great grandfather on my dad's side fought in the 1st and 2nd Balkan Wars as an infatryman for the Greek Army. On my mother's side, grandpa was n my country's armed resistance during WW2 against the Fascists and the Nazis and then was part of my country's army in the Korean War as a radioman.

  37. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My great grandfather died in Auswitz

    He was a young lad no older than these zoomer posting here, it was war so he didn't have much of a choice. He tried his best but it were pretty depressing times for him. He always were a little clumsy so it wasn't a surprise he died only 2 weeks after arriving. He fell down a guard tower and broke his neck.

  38. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got one that makes me giggle sometimes.

    I was deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 while on checkpoint duty a local scraper came through talking about how he found loads of valuable scrap out in the mountains, we didn’t think much about it until we moved away the tarp covering the bed of his truck to find it full of mortar tubes and random bits of electronics. Turns out the guy had found a insurgent cashe by accident when looting old houses and thought they were old plumbing pipes because of how rusty they were, at first he didn’t want to give the location up in fear of a reprisal attack but after offering him a good bit of money he immediately lead a force back to the house. I wasn’t while the team that went to the house but from my understanding it full of old equipment and old artillery shells.

  39. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Great grandpa was a combat medic on Okinawa and it turned him into a mean, hateful, sadistic drunk and it fricked up my family with the generational trauma to this day
    Other great grandpa was a Sherman tanker. He had this big swag bag full of Lugers and MP40s and gold and money and parachute silk and candy bars, but then the tank took a direct hit and blew the engine right out the back of the tank, killing half the crew and destroying the loot.

  40. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jews who came over from Germany after the 1848 socialist revolution and then fought for the Confederacy
    We were on a big fat losing streak for a while

  41. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    crazy, a whole thread dedicated to pussies who spend more time fantasizing about the military exploits of their relatives rather then serve themselves. The average BMI of the posters here must be insanely high.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      History is interesting. Thanks to heeding previous vets and having a fondness for recent history I chose the Air Force and had zero reason to regret that career. Not one of many suggested their own service (Army, Navy or USMC) because vets appreciate serving wisely.

      Uncle WILL get his use from you, so get your contracted due.

  42. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    why the goofy trousers tho?

  43. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Father - Conscript in Afghanistan saw mass rape of local preteens by abkhazians and dagestanis. Came back alcoholic.
    Great grandfather was in Estonian Waffen SS was captured by Soviets whole family was sent to Siberia came back 64 when my mother was born.
    Great great grandfather fought against the Bolshevist in Estonian war of Independence in the cavalry.
    I served my conscription in the Navy and did 2 tours in Afganistan in the army. I have no doubt i have to protect my country against the eastern plague aswell.

  44. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Grandpa fought the Japs at Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima; not sure where else during WWII. He was in Korea and stayed behind to assist recovery. He was also one of the covert advisors in Vietnam back when it was still France’s war, and would go on to be a tunnel rat once the US got involved.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous
  45. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Does this count?
    >My dad participated in development of K2 rifle.

  46. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My grandfather's brother was like ~20 years old and a conscript shortly after WW2 in Greece, during the Civil War. He was coming back to the village on leave and because he was in uniform my grandmother's brothers killed him and buried him in a ditch. My grandfather was younger but later he met my grandmother and they eloped. The two families never really got well with each other, my grandfather barely talked to my grandmother's family and vice versa, but the animosity died down.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >grandmother's brothers killed him
      They killed him because they were Communists, that is.

  47. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    great grandfather was a truck driver,
    Stole 2 m1a1 carbines from ft. benning, based af. I have one and some other relative has the other. Early safety, early sights, high wood, blued bolt.

  48. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My great uncle was a pro pitcher for the Red Sox and died around Okinawa when his plane went down because of fog/radio silence

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Should say they ran out of fuel. Also heard he was a ball turret gunner even though he was like 6’4” apparently? I remember seeing a letter signed by Truman to my great grandmother about it, but I’m not sure if that’s something generic they send to everyone.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Someone is lying to you. There were only two MLB players who died in WWII, and the only one who died in the Pacific Theater was Marine infantry, not an aviator. He was killed by a sniper.
      https://www.mlb.com/news/baseball-players-who-died-in-war-c180898342

  49. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't have anything particularly exciting, but my grandfather, who is Chinese-hawaiian served a Naval intelligence officer in Vietnam. I never talked to him much about it until recently, as I'm also a Sailor. He told me because of how he'd be less conspicuous he'd be sent to do these route reconnaissance missions along the Mekong and other river systems in SE Asia to identify routes the VC were taking to infiltrate and resupply their guys. On a couple occasions the ARVN bailed on him and he'd be out there on his own and he had to be bailed out by U.S. Marines. In one occasion what he described as an amphibious tank (I'm assuming an LVTP-5) fired its cannon during an ambush. It was pretty neat stuff. I remember thinking his missions reminded me of apocalypse now, just without having to assassinate an overweight rogue colonel. After VN he was in the secret service for the Carter, Regan and Bush administrations. I hope to emulate him as I grow older. I need to talk to him about this more

  50. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Grandpa told me this story about how when he was in the Marines the flak vests were giving everyone heatstroke and the AK bullets from the Viet Cong would ricochet inside the flak vest, so everyone in the platoon piled up their vests and Grandpa torched it with his flamethrower

  51. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >be me growing up
    >old man Herb neighbor who talked with a german accent
    >would often tell stories of his youth
    >be Herb
    >always loved airplanes as a kid
    >used to work at Junkers factory at the age of 14 during WW2
    >got drafted at in late '44
    >fought on western front
    >war ended
    >inna French POW camp
    >french passively torturing the POWs
    >sleep deprivation, starvation, demoralization, etc.
    >french would have food on a table in the middle of the camp everyday, but the catch was signing up for the French Foreign Legion
    >many POWs gave in
    >finaly decide to escape
    >plan it out with 3 others
    >somehow actually escape, and all go separate ways
    >run into a old farmer within 5 minutes of escaping
    >farmer decides to help because his son and grandson were missing soldiers
    >start working on a farm RIGHT NEXT TO THE CAMP
    >plow fields day after day
    >feel bad for the POWs
    >sneak to the camp at night to give food to the POWs
    >do this a couple times
    >one of the POWs tells the frogs for good boy points
    >caught by the frogs next night
    >forced to sign into French Foreign Legion
    >spend 2-4 years fricking around in the FFL
    >hate every second of it, looking for a way out
    >eventually sent to french Indochina
    >horrid combat
    >stories of German FFL guys defecting
    >really want to, but hate commies
    >go AWOL
    >spend 5 weeks working way south
    >eventually find passage on a trade junk going to British Malaya
    >after weeks, find work on merchant ship in Malaya
    >3 years sailing the globe
    >end up in Mexico
    >sneak into Texas
    >find job at a German-owned business
    >marry a Texan girl
    >actually get nationalized
    >move to Fort Worth to pursue childhood dream: airplanes
    >apply to Convair and literally put Junkers, wehrmacht, FFL, in resume
    >hired on the spot
    >retired from General Dynamics as a F-16 project manager in the mid 90s
    >every year since US nationalization, would send a postcard to the French Foreign Legion to tell them to get fricked

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's awesome. The post war era must have been a wild time to be alive, especially outside the US.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >literally put Junkers, wehrmacht, FFL, in resume

      >every year since US nationalization, would send a post card to the French Foreign Legion to tell them to get fricked

  52. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >be great grandfather
    >just teenage Irish boy
    >arrested and given the choice between starving to death in prison or being given a new name and signing up for WW1
    >suffer constant abuse
    >undergo mental breakdown in trenches an develop religious psychosis
    >carve crucifixes into everything and believes God will come to earth and drown all soldiers in an ocean of blood
    >recover a little and get involved in the IRA
    >goes on an arms-buying trip to Germany
    >trades explosives to Zentrum supporters who have contacts in the Abwehr
    >later breaks with the IRA over political differences
    >tells his sons nothing of the war

    >be great uncle
    >dad is a crazy, abusive and hardcore combat veteran
    >WW2 kicks off
    >immediately sign up
    >dad freaks out and run away before he can do anything crazy
    >fight in North Africa
    >think war is actually fricking cool
    >get captured in Tobruk
    >spend months as a POW
    >learn German and Italian just to insult captors
    >Italians just abandon posts one night and everyone slips away
    >get redeployed to Europe
    >have an affair with a French girl
    >go back to France immediately after the war
    >bring her and her bastard son back home
    >already agreed to marry a girl from his hometown and sticks to it
    >becomes a mine foreman so he can afford two houses
    >keeps his wife and 4 kids in one
    >keeps his mistress and 2 bastards in the one next door
    >no one ever makes a big deal of this
    >the two women remain firm friends until their dying days

    >be dad
    >fight in Vietnam
    >join as a 6'3 hippy beanpole and forced to carry ammo for the M60
    >get into constant firefights throughout deployment
    >never lose a friend
    >come home jacked from doing daily calisthenics and sprints carrying 60kg+
    >immediately join a biker gang and arrested
    >given the option of joining up again or going to jail
    >goes to jail
    >gets out and goes back home to work the same mine as his father and grandfather

    >be me
    >join the army for free engineering degree
    >go to Iraq and don't suffer at all

  53. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You have to go back, shitskin.

  54. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    great uncle fought at the Grebbeberg and spent most of the war in a German POW camp
    his younger brother got picked off the streets and was put to work in a German factory, died in an air raid
    third brother was called up to work in Germany but got let off on account of him having to support the families of his brothers, granddad was 5 when the war began so not much to tell there
    nephew joined the marine corps recently, but other than some uneventful mandatory services, thats about it for military stories in the familiy

  55. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >be grandfather
    >volunteers for the Army on his 18th birthday
    >they draft the white trash first around here anyway
    >does two tours of duty in Vietnam
    >comes home with a brand new plan
    >buys seeds from Colombia and Mexico
    >plants them in the holler down Copperhead Road
    >Now the DEA's got a chopper in the air
    >wakes up screaming like he's back over there
    >he learned a thing or two from Charlie, don't you know
    >you better stay away from Copperhead Road

  56. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Grandfather Served on USS Nautilus as a torpedoman when it was present at the the Cuban missile crisis.
    He also had a few other funny submarine stories, like the time an officer's hat went down the waste chute and he had to go get it because he was the smallest guy on the ship. And the time while they were at a base, he got drunk and stole a tank. But as a precaution measure the fuel tanks aren't filled very much so when it ran out the marines I think who's tank it was pulled him out and beat the crap out of him.

  57. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Brother:
    >SAW gunner in the muhreens
    >didn't see much action, went inna theater on a MEU once
    >mainly just did moronic shit with the boys that would've gotten them discharged if they got caught
    Grandpa:
    >carried a Bazooka and an M1 way back when
    >never really talked about it
    >loved saying the N word unexpectedly
    >RIP

  58. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Grandpa gets drafted and is part of a unit occupying Poland
    >Grew up in Eastern Prussia in a city with many Poles so knew the language
    >Drinks and plays card with the Poles
    >Local Waffen-SS chud does not like that
    >Grandfather is assigned to penal unit
    >His wife writes a letter to higher up in the Waffen-SS who was a former classmate of hers, so her husband does not get sent to the Eastern Front
    >Waffen-SS guy reads letter, overturns chud's decision and sends him to Italy instead

    >In Italy
    >Surrenders to Americans
    >Grandfather's unit is loaded up on trucks and brought to a beach
    >Americans let them out and order Germans to fill their pockets with stones
    >Grandfather fears they want to drown them
    >Still goes along with it
    >They are ordered to get back into the trucks and drive off afterwards
    >Eventually they meet a bunch of Italians
    >Americans suddenly stop
    >GI says "Look, these were your allies and they betrayed you. Now throw rocks at them." in German
    >Grandpa started throwing rocks at Italians with his friends

  59. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    great-grandfather killed a local gangster in revenge of his dad. While fleeing the authorities he joined anti-japanese guerilla forces. The only legend he passed down was that he slept for an entire day after a fierece battle of hand to hand combat with Japanese.

  60. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Granddad was in the RAF, very probably the only reason I'm here is that after bomber training he was sent to a transport squadron and spent the war dropping nefarious lunchboxes and plumbing to the french and norwegians at night rather than going to bomber command

  61. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    One of my granddaughters was that HR had gotten captured during the war. I can't recall if it was the first or second. The problem was that the Germans searched only his cartridge pouches and took his rifle. His personal kit was left unmolested. Only problem for the germans was that his satchel was full of grenades, which when let loose allowed him to make a break for it and escape to his own lines.

  62. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >dx>61707905
    Listen Im drunk, I meant to say my grandad D

  63. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    my grandpa was part of the Philippine resistance against the japs in ww2

  64. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    my grandfather served in Aden (southern Yemen) mostly keeping the local shias in line and trying to interdict smuggling. He enjoyed the adventure and the combat massively I guess due to it being so novel to see the middle east and east africa (Kenya) for a poor 1940s farmboy. Oddly his brother served in the army a few years later, hated it and wrote many pleading letters home while my grandfather's letters were all about how much he loved driving an armoured car and shooting arabs.

  65. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    my dad commanded the E-2 Hawkeye squadron on the USS John F Kennedy for a few years in the 70s. never went to Vietnam area but was in the Mediterranean when the Yom Kippur War was happening. don't think this ever made the news or anything but he told me there was some sort of engagement between Libyan fighter jets and fighters from the JFK as they were passing through. no losses on either side but missiles were fired

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