>drive around. >still see a sewing machine repair store and a vacuum cleaner store around

>drive around
>still see a sewing machine repair store and a vacuum cleaner store around
Why did those survive disposable appliances but not TV and other repair stores?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sewing machines and vacuum cleaners can be very expensive, thus, cost effective to repair, and since we'll always need clothes and clean spaces, there's a steady demand. Other shit like TV's are basically black boxes now, and you can't get parts without cannibalizing other devices, so there's no point in repairing them.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >so there's no point in repairing them.
      I repaired one for my mommy last week. I'm mom's special boy.
      Turns out that modern flat panel TVs only have a few parts-- there's usually a power supply board, a "brain" which handles the IO and processing, and the screen itself. Sometimes there is a separate driver for the backlight LEDs.
      They're pretty easy to fix, although you're right about the cannibalizing other units part. Ebay and a variety of aftermarket suppliers have cheap parts available for most models.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/7B4wfjU.jpeg

      >drive around
      >still see a sewing machine repair store and a vacuum cleaner store around
      Why did those survive disposable appliances but not TV and other repair stores?

      because probably cause sewing machine are either vintage ones, which is basically akin to today's commercial ones, aka maintenance is not free and if maintained runs good forever,and need a tune up every now and then. my guess is cause vacuum are simple machines most of the time and don't need alot of circuits so they survived.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >couple hundreds for a sewing machune
      >up to 5 figures for superduper flatscreen
      lolno
      it's because not everyone knows how (or is willing) to test/repair highly integrated smd circuitry, because the investment isn't for everyone, and consoomers just don't care and are eager even to throw money out the window for muh latest and greatest tech at the first opportunity.
      otoh sewing already implies willingness to repair, so anyone that bothers sewing already is predisposed to fix the things, rather than just toss 'em and replace with said latest and greatest.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >couple hundreds for a sewing machune
        These days that barely gets you a dogshit beginner machine that can't sew anything heavier than poplin worth a damn and will self-destruct in a couple of years because everything is made of plastic and pot metal. You're looking at $500 minimum for any hobbyist machine worth owning and well into the thousands if you want features, especially embroidery stuff.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's not hard to spend a few thousand dollars on a higher end sewing machine, and they have moving parts that wind up needing repairs.

          still an order of magnitude less than any new tv set; lower than that is low cost/old stock only poor people buy and likely not advantageous to repair because cost and technically obsolete/no longer compatible (another reason why electronics are less and less repaired; which will happen to sewing machines and anything and everything with electronics, in time, as well, btw).
          btw, there was a (french) tv piece on this subject, and they said with a repair cost higher than 30% "new" price, people just don't bother and replace, instead.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >order of magnitude less than any new tv set
            you can get a shitty new TV from walmart for less than $100, wtf are you talking about? Very few people are actually buying the flagship $2000+ FUHD screens.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              you can also find sewing machines in tat pruce range. other than poor people (and even then...), most people actually spend rwal money on expensive tv sets; under 50/55in, they're either old stock or lowcost namebrands, here.
              and no one really buys fhd anymore, except example above; 4 or even 8k (even if there's actually no 4k stations here).

              People are still using 60 year old sewing machines, but no one is using a 60 year old TV.

              this; my sister is still using my grandmother's century old singer.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's not hard to spend a few thousand dollars on a higher end sewing machine, and they have moving parts that wind up needing repairs.

          yeah, ok just dud a quick look into prices here and ar this place, the most expensive was an eye popping 10k, but that's a multireel sewing snd embroidery machine, and so are sll the 4 figure ones. but fact is reoairs sre probably mostly worn-out mechanical parts, which would even be easy to fabricate, if not already cheaply available somewhere in china. when it gets to proprietary stuff, such as electronics,, etc. that's where it gets (over)expensive.
          btw, picrel is a 10yo miele fridge door handle; it's plastic; it's also a 3 figure replacement part. won't be replacing it anytime soon; not for an original part anyway...

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's not hard to spend a few thousand dollars on a higher end sewing machine, and they have moving parts that wind up needing repairs.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Besides the points about value in repairing expensive units that the other anon mentioned, people also use vacuums and sewing machines as important tools to make money with either directly (making/repairing garments and other items with a sewing machine, auto and aircraft and yacht detailing with a vacuum, etc.) ...or in the case of vacuums indirectly to maintain commercial spaces that must be regularly cleaned like restaurants, hotels, medical offices and so on.

      Consumer grade TVs and similar home entertainment devices are throwaway now, but there's techs that still repair professional grade AV monitors and other gear that get used as tools to make money.

      Same with cheap throwaway printers vs commercial ones that have factory service techs and training.

      A lot of those places are just fronts. No way they could be doing enough business to stay open.

      Maybe if they have contracts or something. I mean I know a place that services air compressors and paint sprayers, but they're also an authorized Graco dealer and sell them.

      It's the commercial stuff they fix. Anything consumer they don't as there isn't money in it. They are not going to fix the shit you buy from Walmart.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Besides the points about value in repairing expensive units that the other anon mentioned, people also use vacuums and sewing machines as important tools to make money with either directly (making/repairing garments and other items with a sewing machine, auto and aircraft and yacht detailing with a vacuum, etc.) ...or in the case of vacuums indirectly to maintain commercial spaces that must be regularly cleaned like restaurants, hotels, medical offices and so on.

    Consumer grade TVs and similar home entertainment devices are throwaway now, but there's techs that still repair professional grade AV monitors and other gear that get used as tools to make money.

    Same with cheap throwaway printers vs commercial ones that have factory service techs and training.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A lot of those places are just fronts. No way they could be doing enough business to stay open.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do t know about sewing machines but schools/offices/commercial areas don’t generally use the meme piece of shit Dyson to vacuum. As a former master of the custodial arts, I can tell you a good commercial vacuum isn’t what you buy at Walmart.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Maybe if they have contracts or something. I mean I know a place that services air compressors and paint sprayers, but they're also an authorized Graco dealer and sell them.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Commercial sewing machines are often set up in ways that make them difficult to remove for repairs (plus they're heavy and fragile) so a physical location might be "front" in the sense of being a place to get mail and do office stuff but little actual work goes on there aside from smaller jobs from non commercial customers....but they may be plenty busy in the field with repairs and maintenence contracts.

        Lots of commercial appliance -type places are like that that do printers, copiers, plotters, restaurant equipment, garage equipment machine and worship equipment, etc.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Lots of commercial appliance -type places are like that that do printers, copiers, plotters, restaurant equipment, garage equipment machine and worship equipment, etc.

          I used to work in a cabinet shop and our building was connected to a place that resold used commercial food appliances. We got all the free ice we wanted from their ice machine the always kept running, cubed and crushed. It was pretty sweet.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        sewing machines need a lot of attention, tuning, cleaning, repair. they're complex af. plus they offer fabric and boomer group activities like quilting.

        https://i.imgur.com/7B4wfjU.jpeg

        >drive around
        >still see a sewing machine repair store and a vacuum cleaner store around
        Why did those survive disposable appliances but not TV and other repair stores?

        there are actually places that repair tvs and of course you're ignoring computers which take the place of many previous appliances (e.g. VCR)

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >sewing machines need a lot of attention, tuning, cleaning, repair. they're complex af.
          wrong about every part of this. unless they get abused they usually only need oil.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not true if they actually get used regularly in a commercial setting doing real work, plus just like everything certain brands and specialized machines like multiple needle sergers need more attention and can be finicky...fabric type also factors into how often they need servicing.

            Lots of commercial machines do work that would be "abuse" on even the most robust consumer models, and parts that wear have to be kept up to avoid preventable crashes that can take out other parts.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Besides the points about value in repairing expensive units that the other anon mentioned, people also use vacuums and sewing machines as important tools to make money with either directly (making/repairing garments and other items with a sewing machine, auto and aircraft and yacht detailing with a vacuum, etc.) ...or in the case of vacuums indirectly to maintain commercial spaces that must be regularly cleaned like restaurants, hotels, medical offices and so on.

        Consumer grade TVs and similar home entertainment devices are throwaway now, but there's techs that still repair professional grade AV monitors and other gear that get used as tools to make money.

        Same with cheap throwaway printers vs commercial ones that have factory service techs and training.

        Yeah this is it. Sewing machine repairs might make like 1/20th of their monthly income from domestic consumers repairing grandmas antique sewing machine they found in the attic. The rest of their income comes from making shop calls to tailors, uniform fitters, clothing repair spots etc. that have sewing machines running for 8 hours a day and need regular maintenance and repair.
        These kinds of jobs are few and far between however. The most niche commercial repair jobs I've known of were:
        -plumber specialized in installing/maintaining tap lines in bars & interfacing them with gas cannisters. There are only a handful of them floating around and it's busy enough work.
        -mechanic specialized in repairing industrial food processing machinery. I used to work in a butcher and if our giant mincer, mixer or sausage filler broke production stopped entirely because there was one ONE guy in the country who was qualified to repair those machines. You'd be SOL if you had to wait longer because you'd need to call in a tech from fricking Germany if that guy was busy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >roommates destroy my walmart vac with misuse and skateboards
      >walmart warranty is some third party scam system

      >go to vac repair shop
      >sells me a Panasonic with belt drive and bags
      >lets me know why a bunch of the other style vacs suck
      It still runs flawless.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        One of my favorite YouTube channels is an Irish powertool repair guy. Basically just videos of him dumping a crate of broken powertools on the workbench and going through and fixing them all. Explains everything he's doing, and fills the rest of the silence by b***hing (and explaining in depth) about how shit poor the repairability of most modern tools is.

        https://www.youtube.com/@deandohertygreaser

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this, in my country we have pizza/kebab shops on every street corner even though the population density is low

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The one in my town is legit, it's a family business and there's scads of old women with antique sewing machines around here.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you have no idea of the amount of old people who run small businesses just as an occupation, regardless of profitability. then there's those who still do it, because they've been doing it their entire lives.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cheap front. My grandma will take her Kirby she's had since the 70's there to get it tuned up once a year. Thing is a tank.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They're heavy, and some are self propelled (WTF?) but if you can get one cheap they last forever and really do work better than 99% of what's in the WalMart.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I’ve met older women whose Kirby’s outlived their husbands, and they treat them like some guy who still has his ‘67 mustang or whatever. They made an emotional as well as financial investment in it years ago, and by god they will keep it running. Sewing machines need to be tuned and fixed, it’s a really precise machine.

        I used to play music professionally and have a Hammond M-series keyboard with an outboard Leslie amplifier from the 50's, and a Teac 3340 reel-to-reel machine from the 70's. The Hammond and Leslie are super reliable, I put a drop of 30w oil in some oil cups on both of them, and they go. The last time I had all 3 serviced was 96 or 97, by a dude who was in his 80s, God only knows where I am going to find someone now. I mean there's plenty of guys who can probe for failed caps and clean pots and the like, but the inside of the Teac is a complete insane nightmare and I don't know that anyone is going to want to touch it, or if someone does, that I can even trust them to not frick it up.
        At this point I'd just like to use the Teac to transcribe some of my old recordings to digital, and sell it to a collector once I am done. I dig analog, but digital is so much easier anymore

        Every major area has its R2R guys who repair them. When the time comes get on audiokarma and ask around. What will suck with the teac is when one of the channels goes, and the transistor or whatever you need to replace is buried balls deep in the middle of the thing. I had a nice teac I just sold for nearly nothing, just to free up space. It had been serviced just a few years ago, but fixing the right channel issue was just too goddamn much work.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I can understand the loyalty. For me, it's canister Kenmores from the 80's and 90's. I hit the motor with compressed air maybe twice a year to clean them out, and they're unkillable. The only b***h is hoses wear out, and then out comes the duct tape...

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Where else am I gonna find a new dust filter for my Hoover MaxExtract PressurePro model 60?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i used to live in a neighborhood (~5yrs ago) that had an actual cobbler, and he was doing pretty well. granted, he was hitting the trifecta of dry cleaning, tailoring, and cobbling, but he was good and he always had business.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >my old dry cleaner did shoe repair

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not him but I knew of a dry cleaner who also did alterations and shoe repair. It was in Lafayette, CA and he was in business up until about 10 years ago when he either died or retired.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >TV and other repair stores

    TVs and other electronics used to run on vacuum tubes that would burn out occasionally. You'd need to call a TV repairman every few years, and his job was fairly low skill and effort.

    After that we had devices that were solid state but analog. This style of electronics needs more maintenance and it's something that can be done by a handyman with a service manual. If you ever open up a VCR or TV from the 70s you'll see dozens of little potentiometers that need to occasionally be re-calibrated as the resistance and capacitance of other components drift.

    Modern electronics last a lot longer if they're properly designed. When they break there's nothing you can do short of replacing entire circuit boards. The cost of that and the labor are often more than just buying a new device. It's basically outsourcing the job of a repairman to a Chinese factory worker.

    Sewing machines and Vacuums are mechanical devices. Anything with moving parts needs regular maintenance, and that's something a clever mechanically inclined person can do.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I used to play music professionally and have a Hammond M-series keyboard with an outboard Leslie amplifier from the 50's, and a Teac 3340 reel-to-reel machine from the 70's. The Hammond and Leslie are super reliable, I put a drop of 30w oil in some oil cups on both of them, and they go. The last time I had all 3 serviced was 96 or 97, by a dude who was in his 80s, God only knows where I am going to find someone now. I mean there's plenty of guys who can probe for failed caps and clean pots and the like, but the inside of the Teac is a complete insane nightmare and I don't know that anyone is going to want to touch it, or if someone does, that I can even trust them to not frick it up.
      At this point I'd just like to use the Teac to transcribe some of my old recordings to digital, and sell it to a collector once I am done. I dig analog, but digital is so much easier anymore

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > 30w oil
        I put some 3-in-one oil in mine and it got all waxy after a decade… did you use like car oil or is there special oil that won’t gum up?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          NTA but Hammond makes "generator oil" specifically for the tone wheels and also for lubing the moving parts on Leslies...from what I hear from friends who play them a lot of old techs still have some in an old metal can from half a century + years ago and it's still good.

          Worst thing they can do in regards to lubrication is to sit too long without ever spinning up.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I use just plain old 30w non-detergent motor oil, like what's specified for lawn mowers and small engines. That's what the dude who did the last service told me to use. I've happened across other units that were gunked up but it seemed to be more a case of dust getting into the oil and causing it to solidify.

          https://i.imgur.com/pLO8u19.jpeg

          NTA but Hammond makes "generator oil" specifically for the tone wheels and also for lubing the moving parts on Leslies...from what I hear from friends who play them a lot of old techs still have some in an old metal can from half a century + years ago and it's still good.

          Worst thing they can do in regards to lubrication is to sit too long without ever spinning up.

          Is this still available? I haven't had any issues but I'd just as soon use the stuff that they engineered specifically for it

          I’ve met older women whose Kirby’s outlived their husbands, and they treat them like some guy who still has his ‘67 mustang or whatever. They made an emotional as well as financial investment in it years ago, and by god they will keep it running. Sewing machines need to be tuned and fixed, it’s a really precise machine.

          [...]
          Every major area has its R2R guys who repair them. When the time comes get on audiokarma and ask around. What will suck with the teac is when one of the channels goes, and the transistor or whatever you need to replace is buried balls deep in the middle of the thing. I had a nice teac I just sold for nearly nothing, just to free up space. It had been serviced just a few years ago, but fixing the right channel issue was just too goddamn much work.

          I'll give this a shot, thanks Anon. How much did you get for yours? I see mine (4-track simul-sync) draw pretty good prices online. Got it in the original box from a lady at a garage sale for $100 back in 1995...she said it was used like once, and the condition bore this out. The sound quality is amazing.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >This style of electronics needs more maintenance
      You're on drugs.
      To this day, it's not uncommon to see old Giddings & Lewis PLCs and such cross a repairman's bench. Change the caps, maybe an op-amp or logic gate or two, and it's going to chug away for another 40 years.
      The Voyager space probes are solid-state, ffs.
      >It's basically outsourcing the job of a repairman to a Chinese factory worker.
      That much is true. But just because something's considered disposable, doesn't mean it isn't repairable.
      But the repair biz has been a race to the bottom for a long time now. There's still some specialty work to be had in older robots. Fixing drives never goes out of style. Winding motors and transformers was a good niche to hit 10-20 yrs ago, but these days, it's barely more economical than the chinkslop.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        small engine repair too, there was a place around here 10-12 years ago now it's gone. cheaper to just buy the whole carb from Amazon than fricking with trying to find the right gasket or a new float, let alone cleaning it.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not true
          I clean the carb then charge you the price of new plus labor. Its an easy 150 bucks and usually takes 20 minutes. Dont like it fix it yourself

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            cleaning the carb should be $60. A new carb is like $23.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I work at a local hardware store fixing small engines. Everything from two stroke weed eaters to diesel garden tractors to the occasional 12kw light tower.
          90% of the work I do is cleaning carburetors and sharpening blades, and I only charge an hour of labor and parts, which is never more than $100 all told for small engine work. You're full of shit saying that it's cheaper to swap out an amazon carburetor, most of those $10 chinese carbs are absolute junk and you're better off cleaning and/or rebuilding an oem carb. I keep all the rebuild and gasket kits on hand, but they're all available on amazon for a homegamer.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not sure why you're arguing with me when we seem to be in agreement. Solid state means not vacuum tubes. Analog solid state electronics in particular would often need re-calibration by repairmen over their lifetime. As the capacitor in a TV's LC RF tuner drifts it stops picking up channels as cleanly because the frequency it's tuning to is slightly off. Manufacturers knew this, added lots of internal calibration potentiometers, and wrote service manuals. Digital electronics are much more tolerant of component values drifting over time. A serviceman coming to re calibrate things stopped being a thing.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I'm not sure why you're arguing with me
          No argument here. Just some friendly bantz is all. But I do stand by my original point that solid-state electronics doesn't need more maintenance than, e.g., a vacuum-tube whatever from 1972. The shit can and often does work perfectly for years or even decades without any human intervention.
          >would often need re-calibration by repairmen over their lifetime
          Yes and no. I'm not saying it never happens, only that it's beyond rare in anything made since the 80s. I see plenty of stuff older than me that still has the inspector's lacquer on the pots.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you use to be able to go to stores like radio shack and buy made-in-america parts designed for american-manufactured goods. Even when it was japan being the electronic king, youstill could get made-in-japan parts for it.

      but those vendors dont exist anymore. china has absolutely no reason to sell gweilos spare parts and theres no reason at all for the middle men selling you tvs to ever encourage you to even dream of repairing your own stuff because thats money out of their pocket.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It’s an honest living.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    in my neighborhood there is a truck that drives around during the summer months offering knife sharpening. they drive around and ring a bell in the truck and there’s a window on the side not unlike an ice cream truck. anyone else seen one of these?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      is it run by the town rapist?

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why did those survive disposable appliances but not TV and other repair stores?
    sewing machines and vacuum cleaners are easy and quick to repair parts are all over the place.

    modern tv's are not designed to be repaired if parts are available people don't want to spend the money. this should be obvious to an person who does diy.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sewing machines are a really weird industry, most of the stuff above entry level has really limited online documentation, no published MSRPs, and you can only get them from a brick and mortar retailer. Prices are kinda shocking on them too, my cosplayer ex had a fancy one that could do embroidery and all kinds of other automated stuff (could sew buttonholes completely automatically etc.) and when she got it it was a leftover last-gen model AND on a holiday sale and it was still like $5k, and that was 10 years ago so I can only imagine what they go for now.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Read buttonholes as buttholes and got horny thinking about cosplay girls having costumes with a hole for a tail plug.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I saw a girl at an Anime Expo afterparty last year with no panties and a tail buttplug under a short skirt. Instant diamonds.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I saw a girl at an Anime Expo afterparty last year with no panties and a tail buttplug under a short skirt. Instant diamonds.

        kill each other

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What are you, a Mormon?

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because they're all run by boomers who bought the buildings for 3 barrels of hay and have no overhead

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    TVs are cheap nowadays and not worth repairing unless its some OLED 65"+ model. Though TV repairmen still exist since the company I work at hires TV repairmen whenever they need an out of state subcontractor because if you can fix a tv you can fix most electronics.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Money laundering

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In the last four years I've bought both:
    a vacuum cleaner from a small business vacuum repair shop & Miele canister vacuum dealer
    a sewing machine from a small business sewing machine repair shop & Janome sewing machine dealer

    It was my first sewing machine and I only needed it to make some curtains, so I went pretty entry-level (well, as close to the bottom of the line as the salesperson recommended), but for the vacuum since I use it fairly often I went with a nice Miele. It wasn't cheap, but I'm happy with a good quality machine.

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Money laundering

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >but not TV and other repair stores?
    >most electronic devices cannot be serviced
    sonic welds, glued together, SMD parts, one way construction
    service cost would exceed brand new device

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    People are still using 60 year old sewing machines, but no one is using a 60 year old TV.

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not many people have the nose for it.

    ?si=M2-JItaAoEH0Ye8o

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My mom asked now much I thought her small desktop automatic sewing machine cost (new). I guessed 3.5k
    >16k

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it's funny how people in

      [...]

      throw a tantrum if you suggest their 13 year old pc is less than ideal for music production, a solid upgrade could be had for like $400 if reusing parts from an existing desktop pc, and a pc is useful for many things, while people will spend plenty of money on other things and have first world country living expenses

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      at that price, guaranted it's sewing and embroidery, probably multi reel too; still...

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Probably, but even the simplest single needle straight stitch heavy duty commercial machines that can handle extreme thicknesses/weights of fabric, leather, etc. day in and day out begin in the $2-4K range.

        https://sailrite.com/Sailrite-Deluxe-Fabricator-Sewing-Machine-Package

        https://leathermachineco.com/product/cobra-class-4-p-premium-package/

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          can't compare professional/industrial machinery with consumer; they're made for high duty cycle and reliability and lifespan is essential.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >consumer
            Most people who own sewing machines are not simple "hobbyists" but actually use it either as a source of income or to offset costs.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              don't know about elsewhere, but, over here, most shops are small single person corner shops doing small odd jobs for the neighborhood; machines are either "hobbyist", or old pro machines that have seen better days (years/decades).

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >can't compare professional/industrial machinery with consumer

            The post you are responding to didn't do that.

            The point is that very expensive sewing machines that start at 10x what consumer ones cost and go up from there are not necessarily expensive because of complex stitching or multiple needles or other esoteric features....they may only do one stitch and be as basic as basic gets.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because Sewing machines and Vacuum cleaners are still mostly mechanical devices. TVs and other electronics have virtually no moving parts, and have undergone so much commoditization in the form of unique-per-unit PCBs and such that there's no money in repairing them

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably because they used to make shit out of metal and that shit lasts until a motor burns out or a switch fails/
    I have a Rainbow vacuum from the early 80's that I will keep for my whole life. Works better than any of the newly made shit. Uses water to collect the dirt so it never needs new bags or other shit.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Power nozzle is what the girls called me in highschool

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    TVs and appliances became cheap throwaway shit. Why would you pay $2-300 to repair a tv that you spent $6-800 on 4 years ago. Just buy another, they have cooler features now. It’s fricking dumb and wasteful but people do it and it’s putting entire industries out of business. Then there’s stuff like even if you want to repair your washing machine you’ll see the part that failed after 3 years was really a design flaw because they built it as cheaply as possible to just survive the warranty period, is it worth putting the money and effort into repairing an inherently flawed product when sourcing replacement parts is expensive and a nightmare? Sewing machines and vacuums have commercial options as others have said so they’re somewhat exempt from this as commercial buyers won’t put up with this bullshit.
    This is also why any tv you buy inherently has ads and pre installed apps. they need to subsidize the price of those things by any means necessary. I bought a $2500 oled tv for my living room and had to block the ad servers with my dns server. I had to root the tv to get rid of alexa bullshit. Fricking ridiculous. It wasn’t as bad as a $300 tv with androidtv loaded up with all kind of bullshit but you can’t escape it no matter how much money you throw at them

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