Do any of you larpers own any genuine Wootz or Damascus steel?

Not the new copycat trash. The real deal.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I own guns

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Oh ok well that's cool me too. You have any Damascus steel? That's the thing with this thread.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I own damascus steel guns

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >I own damascus steel guns

          insane how those where made.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >today's mall ninja can spare $4500 for a scope
    >can't budget for a rare, almost magical weapon

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    As far as I know damascus steel doesn't exist anymore. We can't reproduce it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Exactly. But I have an antique one from the days of yore.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        How much does something like that cost. Where do you even buy that?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's rare for wootz to be caught in private hands outside of a museum these days.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Why did OP lie to me.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not that rare. It's constantly available via auctions

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        sorry but that's not wootz

        • 1 month ago
          Vodoriga

          I know how to make that

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Thats not wootz but plain refined steel, like every euro blade used till crucible steel was invented. This was etched so the layers show better, but yes, pre modern Euro steel looks like that or better.
        Should have around a dozen lying around of them in my living room.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        NOT wootz

        https://i.imgur.com/h8PTNcJ.jpg

        Not the new copycat trash. The real deal.

        Yes I have a triple fullered kofghari silver hilted sikh talwar that has a wootz blade. To much is made of this subject though. The peak of steel making for swords was under the British when they implemented quality control for sword blades to try and cut off German importers in the late Georgian and regency era. No culture anywhere every achieved the Napoleonic british swordmakers understanding of blade harmonics for their high end officers swords.Wootz itself has become a petty totemic dribble by inferior muslim and hindo cultures to pretend they rivaled westerners somehow somewhere. In reality wootz blades were of VERY inconsistent quality and prone to fracturing

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          THis is not an arbitary comment and before people rush to b e contrarian remember that at at point in history the Bristish were the absolute engine of the industrial revolution and massive advances in metallurgy and steelmaking ere taking place. In that period it overlaps with the sword still actually being a used weapon in warfare and there were still ample master craftsmen who made swords for the battlefield. It is unique place in history where X marks the spot. I am entirely bored of thousand folded wootz ethic carbon nanotube reality TV crap. Peak sword cutting was the finest quality 1796 or flank officers swords made by certain makers in a very narrow window between 1805 and 1815 (approximately). Finest thrusting swords were European triangular bladed water ground small swords or the 18th century and early 19th. Best cavalry sword for the charge is the British p1912. Most interesting steel is not wootz kris steel from Bali which was also made with vandium traces but is more interesting because it could cast magical fireballs. At least their bullshit is lively Enough of this shit from expatriate muslim thrash and quasi illiterate hindos. It is worse than the weeb crap

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Not Toledo steel, the steel that helped build the Roman empire and outqualified British steel even late century when the blacksmith was in decline.

          I'll give them props for outproducing Toledo steel though in no way were they better quality. It was definitely good enough though that the increased production easily surpassed the total impact. The Bongs actually did the mass-production formula right that Chinks or Poos can't seem to do.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You m issed my point entirely, it was the latest edge of the industrial revolution overlapping with the Napoleonic wars where edged weapons were in widespread use combined with artisanal legacy skills. yes the metallurgy (these were the people who brought us the Bessemer blast furnace) but also the effects of slow grinding on edges and fullers and the exquisite and early understanding of harmonics as trade secrets in Birmingham meant that when they made something good on order for battlefield use, it was probably the best ever made. Imagine the industrial revolution had actually happened in Japan and overlapped with traditional sword makers and widespread use of swords as weapons (nothing to compare with the Napoleonic wars simultaneously though....). That remarkable fusion in time of very centre of teh industrial revolution in England just happened to also be where the sword makers were for reasons and then a massive war while swords where still widely in use and a genuine matter of life or death. The tempering via scientific method grinding on the best light officers (and there is shell of a difference between a troopers and an officers) finished with a harmonic tuning fork tests (and other in house trade secrets from the Rhineland via the Huguenots) means they were the best. Wootz was not special, peoples around the world were using 'meteorite steel' from particular 'magic rocks' to create vanadium trade. Go look at some kris. Kris are a vastly more complex story and history than teh katana or wootz by the way as I say if you want ethic mumbo jumbo.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Kris
              Kris-makers did more than forge the weapon, they carried out the old rituals which could infuse the blade with mystical powers. For this reason, kris are considered almost alive because they may be vessels of spirits, either good or evil. Legends tell of kris that could move of their own volition and killed individuals at will. Some kris are rumored to stand upright when their real names are called by their masters. It was said that some kris helped prevent fires, death, agricultural failure, and many other problems. Likewise, they could also bring fortune, such as bountiful harvests. Many of these beliefs were derived from the possession of different kris by different people. For example, there is a type of kris in Java that was called Beras Wutah, which was believed to grant its possessor an easy life without famine. This kris was mainly assigned to government officers who were paid, in whole or in part, with foodstuffs such as rice.

              There are several ways of testing whether a kris is lucky or not. A series of cuts on a leaf, based on blade width and other factors, could determine if a blade was good or bad. Also, if the owner slept with the blade under their pillow, the spirit of the kris would communicate with the owner via dream. If the owner had a bad dream, the blade was unlucky and had to be discarded, whereas if the owner had a good dream the dagger would bring good fortune. However, just because a blade was bad for one person didn't mean it would be bad for another. Harmony between the weapon and its owner was critical.

              Because some kris are considered sacred and believed to possess magical powers, specific rites needed to be completed to avoid calling down evil fates which is the reason warriors often made offerings to their kris at a shrine.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                To make a kris with power, one first needs a meteor. The best, most powerful swords are made of meteorite iron, he said.

                Meteorite Still Used

                Centuries ago a big meteor fell near the present site of the Hindu Prambanan Temple ruins near Jogyakarta. It was dug up and brought to the sultan’s palace in the city. Today, palace craftsmen still use its dwindling remains, Jiwodiharjo said.

                He and other kris craftsmen have to make do with ordinary iron these days. Nickel is used to create intricate patterns on the blade, giving each sword a unique character that is supposed to mystically mesh with its owner.

                In the old days, according to popular belief, the kris-maker formed the curves of the white-hot blade with his hands and cooled it down by licking it with his tongue.

                Jiwodiharjo prefers more conventional techniques to make a special sword. With two assistants gripping the blade and one working a bellows for the fire, he pounds the hot metal with his hammer in a hypnotic rhythm.

                Fasting and Praying

                This continues for several days, during which the sword master fasts and prays, before the blade is immersed in rice water, which blackens the metal and highlights the nickel engravings.

                The kris was originally designed to inflict maximum injury on an enemy, with the wavy blade opening up a wound much wider than the blade itself.

                Mystics believe that the blade of powerful swords, whose curves represent certain special properties, need only be pointed at an enemy from a distance to inflict an incurable illness on the target. They believe these swords can fly too.

                Singapore’s ambassador to Indonesia in the early 1970s, Lee Khoon Choy, wrote in his book “Indonesia Between Myth and Reality” that he once witnessed a kris sword fly out of a Muslim cemetery in central Java late at night.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Puzzled and Wary

                The demonstration left him puzzled and wary about kris power, he said.

                Other foreign residents of Indonesia also express an understandable caution toward the kris phenomenon. An American consultant for a rural aid project said he bought a kris from an antique dealer and hung it on a bedroom wall.

                He said he woke up in a fright one night when he first heard and then saw the sword rattling against the wall. His servant said it was because the kris wanted to be anointed.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      We can produce steel with more or less identical material properties to the stuff, but the mine from which the iron used to make wootz steel came from ran dry in the late 1700's which is why the genuine article cannot be made anymore
      Additionally, once the supplies of wootz steel dried up the smoths in Damascus who knew how to work it stopped passing on the knowledge to their apprentices, which is how Damascus steel was lost.
      Whether or not it still exists therefore largely comes down to whether or not you distinguish between "wootz like" crucible steels and actual, genuine wootz steel

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Modern "wootz" can only approximate the rough stuff. Blue water steel wootz has never been replicated in the lab or experimentally.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Damascus
      Isn't this a cope way to deal with shitty quality metal? You can go to any stationary shop, buy a bunch of utility knifes there and forge them into damascus blade.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It’s completely authentic.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Still be just poor quality iron forged in several layers, inferior to any modern blade, which is made from industrial steel.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No, you can't
        The american blacksmith association unilaterally decreed that "Damascus steel" is any steel that happens to be pattern welded which is where the misconception comes from
        Actual Damascus steel is a very specific, very rare alloy with unique material properties and has never been produced by an American smith

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What a fuck are you talking. Damascus steel was replicated many times, though it's useless nowadays except as fancy toy.
          >American smith
          I didn't even mentioned them.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You can make steel with similar material properties to the stuff but the mine where the iron comes from ran dry a couple of centuries ago so the genuine article is impossible to make
            More importantly, pattern welding does not make something Damascus steel and the production of wootz steel is not "a cope way to deal with shitty quality metal". In fact, the quality of the metal is so critically important that the steel became impossible to reproduce once the iron was no longer available - a situation on recently overcome through modern steel production processes

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You might be thinking of Tamahagane ("flower steel") which is used to make Katana

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >We can't reproduce it.
      Wrongarooney, it's been reproducible for decades, and arguably some places never stopped making it, but myths abound.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        We can reproduce it, it just sucks ass. Even chink Walmart steel outperforms it on every metric.
        It does look cool though.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Centuries now.
        A Russian metallurgist had it figured out in the early 1800s

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >early 1800s
          Anosov (through massalski) worked it out by observing its production in bukhara in 1840-1842. Closer to mid 19th than early 19th. But yes.
          And the last eyewitness account we have for its production in the subcontinent is 1902-1903 by ananda Coomaraswamy in Sri Lanka, though some people in India claim they remember their grandparents making it so it likely continued in pockets elsewhere too

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      dab of vanadium and the right process. It is in no way unique to India or Indo Persia either. They just like to think it is. It is the indopersian version of triple folded how great we are how the fuck did the white people colonise the shit out of us when we were kangz. The phrase damasus still brings the same retarded morons who thing crucible steel and pattern welded and have the same boring coversation. Then the same boring cock stroking nonsesnse youtube commentaries from beard strokers holding swords that were primarily used from horseback about how they were used to kill people by people who have never killed anyone and can't ride a horse. Boring. Muh muslims thousand folded katana. What a wonderful thing the destruction of the vile otttoman and iranian shah was what decrepit savage brutal craven worthless peoples these were.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      damascus steel is just crucible steel with good marketing. we can not only make steel with its properties, we can make steel with better ones

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    TO KILL KILL KILL ! WITH COLD BLUE STEEL !

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    if no one knows how to make it, who is qualified to identify it ?
    besides this its now a collectors piece, no longer a usable item

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      OP is showing off his totally real highly rare Damascus blade Mr. Chang sold him for a few hundred (he gave him a good price cause he likes him)

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Show us your Glock.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          My Glock is locked up and I'm not going to my gun safe here's my carry though

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Damascus steel can be identified by the presence of carbon nanostructures within the alloy (instead of just individual atoms spread through the iron as found in most steels) and the remarkably high purity of the iron itself.
      This information was gained through spectroscopic analysis of surviving blades and similar techniques

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >wootz
    Nah but I have some zOMG l337 h4xx0r steel.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I hate you metallurgy-lets so much

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Damascus is cope. It's literally to make up for shitty alloying capacity.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You have literally no idea what you are talking about
          Whatever alloy you are thinking of, it is not Damascus steel

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Not the new copycat trash
    It's the same shit and knives are for 14 yo cringe gays. Get a real gun

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That shit looks fake as fuck. I hope you bought it from a auction house with proof of authenticity from a third party IHN or it's a repetition of that anon wasting 4k on a souvenir sword

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It ain't fake, it's just regular historic steel. Before the invention of modern crucible steel by Huntsman in the 1740's all steel in Europe would have been made by "refining" bloomery iron which basically means flattening out, folding and fire welding repeatedly. That gives that nice distinct layers. normally you wouldn't see them because polished, but when the surface is corroded you can see the pattern. It's just a regular, pre-modern blade steel.
      Wootz is something entirely different, it's a Indo-Persian pre modern crucible steel with special properties where crystal structures in the steel matrix form the patterns.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Monosteel was a thing since the migration period in Europe you mongoloid.
        Folded steel was still occasionally used sure but not usually. You only really find folded steel on migration period blades and classical period blades.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >he doesn't know what monosteel means
          monosteel means one refined piece of steel was used in the construction of a sword blade, unlike several different pieces welded together to make a blade before. It means nothing about how he steel was produced. and that was refined steel (folded) until the advent of modern crucible steel.
          Now stop embarrassing yourself you dumb fuck!

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            https://www.medievalware.com/blog/medieval-steel-bloomery/

            >It means nothing about how he steel was produced
            Most medieval steel was Bloomery Steel that did not require folding, just hammering out the impurities after being dug out of the furnace. This is well documented from the archaeological finds of swords and other weapons. Better practices meant more homogenous steel meant less need to fold so they didn't bother for most swords.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Most medieval steel was Bloomery Steel that did not require folding,
              All bloomery iron needs folding and refining to become steel you retard. It's a shitton of work to turn it into mealable iron and several times more so if you want to have actual steel that you can harden. That was why swords in Europe tended to be pieced together, soft iron core, steel cutting edge etc. in the 12th century Europeans began to use water powered bellows for their furnaces and water powered hammer works used to refine the iron meant they could produce more, cheaper and larger pieces of refined steel. That then lead to more frequent use of monosteel construction for sword blades. The steel still looks the same, folded.
              Now please go fuck yourself because either you're a full blown retard or a very bad strawman, either way I'm out of this shit thread.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >either way I'm out of this shit thread.
                I accept your defeat

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Are you for real? How did you think they managed to repeatedly hammer the bloomery iron without folding it? Do you really think they just kept hammering it until it became a really thin sheet of metal? Or do you think they started with a stack tens of feet high and just kept hammering it until it was at billet height?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, this anon is right. Bloomery was forge consolidated and then repeatedly folded. This also slowly carburised the iron (with the right forge conditions) which is how it was made into steel.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Can no longer be made
    It fucking baffles me that we, as a species, can just outright forget how to make something in the span of a few centuries.
    Hell, we'll probably look at modern electronics in a few hundred years and say "Yeah, we can't make that anymore". Even if it's useless (we become too advanced that it serves no purpose or we become too retarded that basic electricity is too complex for the great majority of us) it's just really fucking crazy how knowledge can be lost to time.
    Really makes you wonder if Alexandria really had useful knowledge.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It doesn't even take that long, we can't even make half the shit we did in the 50s and 60s because no one bothered to save the paper schematics and plans

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >paper schematics and plans
        They exist, but somewhere deep in archives.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >master to apprentice training disrupted
      >specific mine is played out
      >industrial production improving elsewhere
      It's really not the hard to imagne.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    look at me, i bought a sword on ebay and left the rust all on it because im an enthusiast. what are you gonna show us your bayonet collection next?

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    And on any genuine antique wootz blade? You won't see the difference ecept in tiny spots if you know what you are looking for unless you ruin it by acid etching it again because if it is 200 years old at which point you have turned it into a piece of over cleaned scrap. An all to common event given the rise of the nu sword collector who watches to much youtube. I have actually had people tell me they have polished off blue and gilt on family heirlooms because they watched people using metal polish top clean swords on you tube (that bald man British man). No no no no.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. Fun fact: it's shit for holding an edge. Nothing beats a homogeneous steel blade, which is why the Europeans went from pattern-welded blades to Ulfberht-branded ones in the ninth century. Honestly, I've tried. Dad bought me two knives from a custom knife maker, one Damascus, and I cannot get a good edge on the fucking thing. The properties of the stuff are pure mythology.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You think you love weapons? Meet this guy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://www.youtube.com/c/TheKerisCollector

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    real question, what are some good vendors of whatever the modern day non-genuine equivalent of wootz/damascus blades?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >real question, what are some good vendors of whatever the modern day non-genuine equivalent of wootz/damascus blades?
      You are a babe in the woods anon one problem with this is that a lot of 'wootz' is from places where scamming is away of life like India etc. For antiques teh UK because they looted the best of teh Indian stuff and ottoman stuff.

      https://www.thesikhwarehouse.co.uk/products/gold-hilt-tulwar

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Peter Burt, Daniel cauble, niko Hynninen, mert tansu, kilic osman baskurt and over 100 other modern smiths make crucible steel with the correct microscturure of cementite spheroids in a matrix of pearlite or sorbite. Picrel is nikos steel

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >banana
      Hehe

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You probably need to get those pre 18th century ones just to make sure.

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