Disabling vehicle upon abandoning

last year when we were all shocked by the amount of untouched armor and the vehicles abandoned by Russians, I talked with some Americans (from America) here, and some of them told me stories about their fathers being issued phosphorus grenades just in case they have to abandon the vehicle, so they can destroy it or make inoperable for the enemy.

Would you be so kind and refresh my memory? I remember it being a common practice during the Vietnam war, and that it was deployed during Gulf War, but what was it carried on later on?
Waren't phosphorus munitions banned later on?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Russian battle doctrine assumed they would fight NATO who would never use captured vechiles, thus they were not trained to scuttle because they assumed they could just recapture it later.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Pola/k/

      Yeah yeah I know all that.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the grenade in your pic related is a smoke grenade, white phosphorous is commonly used in smoke grenades because it makes a lot of smoke, that smoke is not burning and the grenade does not throw burning phosphorous around
    the grenades your friends were talking about are likely thermite/incendiary grenades which were designed to destroy equipment

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Thermite
      Good Stuff. A pound of thermite on the engine block and that vehicle isn't going anywhere under it's own power. It's not just the heat, it's the liquid iron dripping onto moving parts and welding them together.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Motor-T here, we were trained to drop a thermite grenade in the engine block, but never got issued any thermite grenades when I was in. Throwing dirt or something in the gas tank is probably the most realistic course of action, and if that fails then firing a 240 belt at the tires and steering column might be enough to brick the vehicle heavily enough to make it unappealing to recover.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For what its worth some old hats that encountered these kinds of situations in other conflicts told me when things get captured intact its usually because of some agreement, a la "pour sand in the fuel tank and were going to skin all your POW buddies with a dull knife" or russian doctrine being focused on recapturing or replacing it with ukrainian analogues
    t. slav

    • 3 weeks ago
      Pola/k/

      Thanks bro.

      yeah I know it was a common practice.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >be tank mobik on the front lines, everything is going to shit as usual
    >time to ABANDOOOOOOOOOOON
    >open hatch, ready to get out
    >"oh wait, commissar said to disable tank before abandoooooooning!"
    >pull out grenade, drop in tank
    >proceed to get out
    >grenade blows up inside tank, detonates ammo depot
    >everything in a 50ft radios around the tank is blown to shit
    >including me

    Scuttling is putting abandoooners at risk, personally I wouldnt do it.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I doubt they bother with anything specific anymore. When we left Afghanistan we destroyed as much equipment as we could just breaking windows and electronics since the ANA wasn't using it anymore. The Taliban actually complained that we basically just left a mess behind. Though some were also afraid we had left nerve gas or something in some hummers, I'm guessing someone just felt sick and they all freaked out.
    Might still be up on youtube, just some guys walking around the airport with all sorts of broken helicopters shit in the hangars.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No there's generally procedures you have to follow with vehicles. It's generally about making it useless for combat and erasing any cryptographic keys there (so the enemy signals troops, which will be there if this is a competent army you're fighting, can't just lift the keys or use the equipment).

      People like

      Motor-T here, we were trained to drop a thermite grenade in the engine block, but never got issued any thermite grenades when I was in. Throwing dirt or something in the gas tank is probably the most realistic course of action, and if that fails then firing a 240 belt at the tires and steering column might be enough to brick the vehicle heavily enough to make it unappealing to recover.

      were trained on it but were obviously not seen as critical enough to bother supplying special equipment or training. Any tanker anon here will be able to attest that there's specific things you have to do.

      As for why the Russians aren't doing it? Probably a mix of incredibly poor training and no personal "motivation" to do it. Same reason we haven't seen much use of smoke generators/grenades on tanks.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sure I imagine anything particularly important was given more attention, but I think most of that stuff was shipped out long before. That video I can't find anymore, was basically buried under all the videos of the withdrawal, but they had been pulling all the US's own gear back for months in advance, since the deal had already been made under the previous administration and there was no indication of it being reneged on, just delayed a bit.
        It was basically this in reverse https://youtu.be/aIGP6CD0oBw
        Starting to think they deleted the video for some reason, by my vague recollection it was posted several months before the final withdrawal. Searching anything just gets the people swarming the planes shit, though a few videos from nearly 10 years ago kind of reminds everyone how long we've been trying to leave that fucking place https://youtu.be/QChTF7JGRI0
        But I guess everyone forgot, or never cared, that news report only has a few hundred views seemingly.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        oh yeah, obviously if you've got a BFT or SINGCARS in your truck there's steps you have to take to dispose of that properly, but as far as the actual vehicle itself the prevailing doctrine was "ehhhhhh, we'll figure it out if we ever have to cross that bridge."
        As an aside, for some reason I remember in boot camp the drills always telling us that if we have to destroy our small arms for whatever reason, we'd have to shoot the gun's action or chamber with a larger calibre bullet- so a 5.56 platform could only be destroyed by a 9mm. It sounded fucking stupid but for some reason it's always stuck with me. Never bothered to check if that's an actual regulation somewhere or if my drills were making shit up

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It kind of makes sense when they say larger caliber bullet in that I think that 7.62 NATO to 5.56 NATO would work.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > their fathers being issued phosphorus grenades
    We still do. I kept one in each of my Platoon's vehicles in Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan, on top of the demo kit for random shit.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >pola/k/
    >PrepHole
    Post guns and groups or take the name off.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Post guns and groups

    • 3 weeks ago
      Pola/k/

      Hahaaha, or what. 🙂

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Drop trow in the drivers seat

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pour 100ml if water in gas tank and its done for.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *