Conversion Systems

I love conversion systems. It's fascinating just what a massive leap in firepower they were, but still cheaper than new rifles.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ive got a Nepalese Snider, their machining was so shit that my chamber is more than 20 thousandths out of round. I've bit to get it reemed and rechambered.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It that really a problem?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        it's so bad a guy wouldn't sell me a custom mold for my Snider because it wouldn't work.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          20 thousandths? Really? What's the acceptable range?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine you're some tribal warrior used to whypipo unloading into your ranks and then you charge them for melee (and they still rape you with bayonets, but at least it's honorable or whatever), but one day the white devils have what look like the same rifles except they now unload five or six shots into your ranks in the time they could previously fire two.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Needham, famously used by the Fenians.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I love the paper/linen cartridge rifles, especially with the external percussion caps. I always wonder just how far back you could go in time and make these en masse. Imagine what a mere 100 Jenks rifles could've done for Washington.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Forgot pic.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      As far as that goes, mercury fulminate could have been made earlier. It is a pretty simple compound.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The real issue was that most conversion systems ended up being as expensive as new rifles.
    IIRC, the Trapdoor Springfield for example was totally not worth the time and complexity over just buying Remington rolling blocks.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Springfield had more time and ingenuity than money.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Allin conversions were just like every other government cost saving measure. After the Civil War, when rifle muskets were radiply made obsolete by the advent of metallic cartridges, there was no way that congress was going to fund a new American service rifle for the peacetime army. So they used what they had and made it work.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I used to live in tribal country and conversions were very common. The region was full of military arms but the tribesmen were reluctant to use them, you often saw conversions where hunters wanted more fire power in case they ran into enemies. The conversions were largely indistinguishable from the original guns and that was a major reason they were used. Anyone who's seen real combat will get this, why flamethrowers were disguised as rifles, why RPG isn't carried shouldered, why LMG lacks features that would obviously support its use (no pun intended).

    I would break these down into three classes.
    1. Conversions to make obsolete weapons serviceable
    2. Conversions to stretch the capacity of legally owned weapons.
    3. military surplus rechambered to burn through obsolete ammo

    So for example it was very common to see black powder pistols converted to fire shotgun cartridges. I won't explain how but it's a simple process that yields a reliable (though wrist breaking) weapon. A weapon of last resort, something your grandpa would shoot your uncle with to stop him raping your daughter. These were valuable antiques, but as pistols couldn't be easily purchased the black powder ones are held onto at any cost.

    Another common one was weaponized shotguns, if the weapon was built around a shotgun it was legal. I don't know who's rules these were, I doubt it was actually the law, but among the villages it was decided that any shotgun was "for hunters" but any military weapon was a sign of aggression and the wielder was likely to be shot on sight.
    So you got these fricking heraldric shotguns covered in tastles and enormous sword bayonetes and lever action revolver breaches and crossbows mounted to bottom rails and armour piercing slugs and six musket balls jammed down one barrel. If it was designed to be too garish to be hidden

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The third kind I didn't see were the hillbilly squad support weapons. Basically the villagers got a surplus stockpile of ammo nobody could use, welded any barrel the ammo would fit to into a working magazine and turned it into a blowback LMG. Spraying a couple of hundred rounds at the enemy at a distance of 5 metres could win you most engagements in the jungle, where the high and low ground were only metres apart and you couldn't really take cover nor catch anyone in the open.
      Spray hundreds of rounds, hope the enemy were too fricked up to return fire, charge them and shoot/stab them in the bushes at point blank range. It's entirely viable to charge an enemy if you're only two meters away from them to begin with. A blowback LMG is what your column carries on a night march to prevent being butchered by an unknown foe in the dark at two meters standoff. It's a chainsaw.

      Technically the most impressive parts were the mags, often the whole thing was built around a single LMG mag. Never belt feed, usually a ridiculous Chinese drum mag, a Lewis gun mag, any magazine with a spring because they were blowback operated.

      The third kind I didn't see were the hillbilly squad support weapons. Basically the villagers got a surplus stockpile of ammo nobody could use, welded any barrel the ammo would fit to into a working magazine and turned it into a blowback LMG. Spraying a couple of hundred rounds at the enemy at a distance of 5 metres could win you most engagements in the jungle, where the high and low ground were only metres apart and you couldn't really take cover nor catch anyone in the open.
      Spray hundreds of rounds, hope the enemy were too fricked up to return fire, charge them and shoot/stab them in the bushes at point blank range. It's entirely viable to charge an enemy if you're only two meters away from them to begin with. A blowback LMG is what your column carries on a night march to prevent being butchered by an unknown foe in the dark at two meters standoff. It's a chainsaw.

      Technically the most impressive parts were the mags, often the whole thing was built around a single LMG mag. Never belt feed, usually a ridiculous Chinese drum mag, a Lewis gun mag, any magazine with a spring because they were blowback operated.

      That's pretty fascinating, and the dichotomy in logic used by the tribesmen about firearms is really interesting. Converting any old gun they can get their hands on into a shotgun because those are for hunters, but also making Khyber pass LMGs in their back rooms and letting off whole mags into the bush just to make sure nothing's out there.

      Out of curiosity, what part of the world was this? Sounds a bit like the southern Philippines, but they're not so shy about guns down there. Mindinao especially is the favorite haunt of every insurgent group in PI history.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The third kind I didn't see were the hillbilly squad support weapons. Basically the villagers got a surplus stockpile of ammo nobody could use, welded any barrel the ammo would fit to into a working magazine and turned it into a blowback LMG. Spraying a couple of hundred rounds at the enemy at a distance of 5 metres could win you most engagements in the jungle, where the high and low ground were only metres apart and you couldn't really take cover nor catch anyone in the open.
    Spray hundreds of rounds, hope the enemy were too fricked up to return fire, charge them and shoot/stab them in the bushes at point blank range. It's entirely viable to charge an enemy if you're only two meters away from them to begin with. A blowback LMG is what your column carries on a night march to prevent being butchered by an unknown foe in the dark at two meters standoff. It's a chainsaw.

    Technically the most impressive parts were the mags, often the whole thing was built around a single LMG mag. Never belt feed, usually a ridiculous Chinese drum mag, a Lewis gun mag, any magazine with a spring because they were blowback operated.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Other funny things. They had to make their own extractors and usually reasoned that the weapon was more reliable without a dust cover and extra extractors. So they carried these things with plastic bags over them. No bipod because the ground was often unreachable due to vegetation, similarly no entrenching. Get behind a tree, rambo the bush which makes noises.

      Establish by mobile phone where each individual tribe member was, if they're all accounted for assume the rustling is an enemy, machine gun the bush.
      Almost every day you heard automatic gunfire and everyone was on their mobile at exactly the same time reporting their position to militia command.
      >Hunter opened fire at a pig
      >Hunter opened fire at nothing
      >Hunter opened fire at a ghost
      >Hunter being a moron
      >Nobody will admit who opened fire, nobody was fired on
      Lot of time and anxiety stemming from these incidents, with the constant fear of local assassinations, vendettas inside and between villages, with narcos, terrorists, government forces, cia, everyone's constantly on their phone, nobody is safe, someone's always shooting.

      Bolt actions converted into black powder weapons because they had good quality rifled barrels. Easy to manufacture mini balls of the right (large) calibre, they were remarkably accurate. Why use them over a regular shotgun? I don't know, probably because they were discarded after killing someone with them. They WEREN'T a shotgun so nobody who owned a shotgun could be blamed. This shotgun/ not a shotgun thing came up a lot. Like the US pistol/ not pistol thing

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The third kind I didn't see were the hillbilly squad support weapons. Basically the villagers got a surplus stockpile of ammo nobody could use, welded any barrel the ammo would fit to into a working magazine and turned it into a blowback LMG. Spraying a couple of hundred rounds at the enemy at a distance of 5 metres could win you most engagements in the jungle, where the high and low ground were only metres apart and you couldn't really take cover nor catch anyone in the open.
        Spray hundreds of rounds, hope the enemy were too fricked up to return fire, charge them and shoot/stab them in the bushes at point blank range. It's entirely viable to charge an enemy if you're only two meters away from them to begin with. A blowback LMG is what your column carries on a night march to prevent being butchered by an unknown foe in the dark at two meters standoff. It's a chainsaw.

        Technically the most impressive parts were the mags, often the whole thing was built around a single LMG mag. Never belt feed, usually a ridiculous Chinese drum mag, a Lewis gun mag, any magazine with a spring because they were blowback operated.

        I used to live in tribal country and conversions were very common. The region was full of military arms but the tribesmen were reluctant to use them, you often saw conversions where hunters wanted more fire power in case they ran into enemies. The conversions were largely indistinguishable from the original guns and that was a major reason they were used. Anyone who's seen real combat will get this, why flamethrowers were disguised as rifles, why RPG isn't carried shouldered, why LMG lacks features that would obviously support its use (no pun intended).

        I would break these down into three classes.
        1. Conversions to make obsolete weapons serviceable
        2. Conversions to stretch the capacity of legally owned weapons.
        3. Military surplus rechambered to burn through obsolete ammo

        So for example it was very common to see black powder pistols converted to fire shotgun cartridges. I won't explain how but it's a simple process that yields a reliable (though wrist breaking) weapon. A weapon of last resort, something your grandpa would shoot your uncle with to stop him raping your daughter. These were valuable antiques, but as pistols couldn't be easily purchased the black powder ones are held onto at any cost.

        Another common one was weaponized shotguns, if the weapon was built around a shotgun it was legal. I don't know who's rules these were, I doubt it was actually the law, but among the villages it was decided that any shotgun was "for hunters" but any military weapon was a sign of aggression and the wielder was likely to be shot on sight.
        So you got these fricking heraldric shotguns covered in tastles and enormous sword bayonetes and lever action revolver breaches and crossbows mounted to bottom rails and armour piercing slugs and six musket balls jammed down one barrel. If it was designed to be too garish to be hidden

        If you're being honest, this is really cool.
        Thanks for sharing. That is very colorful.

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