Cinder block foundations

Anyone ever done anything like this? Is it reliable?

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It is afaik the most common way to support mobile homes/trailers. Although they incorporate the use of tie-down anchors to provide resistance to wind loads. Pic related.

    As far as reliability goes, yes concrete piers can be "reliable" in most soil types as long as you design and install them properly for your situation. What is your specific question, use case, or concern?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      derp. pic related

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Building a cabin, red soil, subtropical climate. I'm worried because I haven't really seen anything like that around here, most houses I've seen so far have either wood piers or concrete foundations. What's the deal with the wind? I thought a 25m2/270sqft cabin would be heavy enough for it to not be a problem.

      https://i.imgur.com/IHoTLiL.jpg

      lmao fuck the horse

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >What's the deal with the wind?
        when wind blows against one side of the building, it exerts a force on the building (https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/wind-load-d_1775.html)
        If you're in a region where you see strong wind in storms sometimes, then the forces involved can become tremendous when they are pressing against the broad side of your house.

        I think most of the time in warm areas, the wood pier foundations have diagonal bracing such as that shown in my pic related. This helps to prevent "racking" due to wind loads.
        The posts are also embedded for some/most of their length into the ground which helps to prevent overturning or sliding.
        With your block piers that you show in your pic, they really don't provide a lot of resistance to lateral loads. They simply support the building vertically.
        As I said-- it's common to use cinder block piers to support mobile homes and other types of trailers, but these piers only provide support against vertical or gravity loads; protection against lateral or overturning wind loads is provided by tie down anchors

        It's a good idea to not overthink this kind of stuff too much and to keep it in perspective. If you're in an area that doesn't get hurricanes, frost heave, or issues with earthquakes etc, then the odds are that you could probably just build a house on a stack of rubble and it would be fine for decades. You're talking about building something very small and probably cheap. If you were spending hundreds of thousands of dollars building something that you wanted to last for many decades or longer, then it would make more sense to really ensure that you were using a robust design approach.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'm in South Brazil, we have storms, of course, I have never seen anything like your pic. I'm checking weatherspark and windier part of the year has an average of 7.8 miles per hour. It rains a lot there, however. I've found some news about winds blowing trees away, but they're all from a particular wind in 2019. It's not really a constant thing.

          I'm reading about tie down anchors right now, thank you for the tip.

          Yeah, just a small cabin. I mean, I don't feel like replacing it every couple years, but it's not really like a hugeass house.

          Concrete block is a normal construction method, pour a slab under it, buried, then block

          Thank you, found some pics, seems very intuitive.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Seu infeliz do caralho, pare de tentar aplicar método de construção norte americano na porra do Brasil. Mete uma fundação de viga baldrame e joga teu barraco de madeira em cima, porra.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              São 15km de terra pra chegar no terreno, cara. Sei lá como vou levar o material pra lá.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Find out the prevailing wind, the direction the wind blows from most of the time then point to it with the corner of your building, like the bow of a ship cuts through the waves

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >I think most of the time in warm areas, the wood pier foundations have diagonal bracing such as that shown in my pic related. This helps to prevent "racking" due to wind loads.
          Triangulation is how you make it load bearing. Has nothing to do with wind. Think of a roof.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Please elaborate. Diagonal bracing absolutely addresses racking/wind issues-- this is the concept behind shear walls and let-in bracing in wood walls.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              Elaborate on what? You learn this in 5th grade science/maths when they have you build the toothpick bridge.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I'm worried because I haven't really seen anything like that around here, most houses I've seen so far have either wood piers or concrete foundations.
        Generally with construction and foundations in particular, if everybody in your area is doing it a certain way, then there's probably a very good reason for it. In my area (BC, Canada), for example, a simple cinder block foundation would last you maybe a couple years tops if you got really lucky because we get everything from intense summer heat to frigid cold to mudslides etc. at some point in the year. It's really hard to put anything in the ground here and make it stay in place and survive, which is why anything more important than a shitty garden shed is made with deep concrete foundations. So if you care about the structure at all, I would just copy what you see others in your area doing.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Concrete block is a normal construction method, pour a slab under it, buried, then block

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah but be prepared to shim the house for the next 3-5 years.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >done
    Yes.
    >reliable
    Yes. Assuming it was originally level and set deep enough.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did this for a 12x16 toolshed on a gravel pad a few years back, so far so good

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My house is built like that but. . . Instead of treated lumber it has galvanized flashing.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I live in desert climate AZ.
    Any wood in soil will get ate by termites or fungus over time.
    So a footing of stone dry stacked and that is what you floor frame on.
    Its dry here but when it rains it floods and the soil comes alive.

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Did it for a couple years in the woods with blocks of treated wood. It got to 20 degrees Fahrenheit both winters and stayed level. Small cabin with the small side facing the dominant wind direction. If you have a small building you can lift it with hydraulic jacks to level or upgrade footings.
    You’ll be fine.

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I did a pier and beam foundation for my 14x28 cabin shell. I'm in southern Missouri and frost line is about 2 to 2 and a half feet down. I'm way too fucking lazy to mix concrete and make sure it was correct ratios and all that so I bought these precast concrete piers. All you gotta do is dig the hole, throw down some 3/4" gravel in the hole, then place the base and stack the bitches up and backfill. The load bearing of these beams is enormous even in shitty clay soil.

    Live Load + Dead Load calculations said I only needed 6 but I just did 8 beams to be safe. Fucking hate concrete work I'll pay the premium for these things again if I had to.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      what did they cost vs pouring yourself?

      I always wonder about those ancient Greek columns that appear to be basically this, except obviously without the rod in the middle. I know they are heavy as shit, but without that rod I always thought they would be a tad wobbly

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        When I bought them these EZ Columns were $174 each for the whole thing in that pic from Puerto Rico Depot. Looks like they're $189 now. It's a ready-made foundation for $1400.

        Going to sonotubes which aren't as stable because they don't have the foot you also need more of them + rebar is a good idea. Doing it that way would have probably cost me about $600-700. Saying it cost "twice as much" sounds bad but spending the extra $700 to not have to rent a mixer and the concrete vibrating dildo machine, somehow get a large volume of water to the site, (this is off-grid and the well hadn't been put in yet), do that in the sun for hours and hours, alone, etc. $700 and done and your back and knees are safe for another day.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Congrats, you’ve avoided tensile strength and moment resistance.

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