car radiator AC

I was thinking of making a makeshift cooling unit from a used car radiator by running cold water through it and having a fan in front/back of it. Maybe a a bucket below for condensing water. Could I use something better? What are the dangers of using a car radiator for this?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What are the dangers of using a car radiator for this?
    umm probably just that it would suck ass as your desired task and waste more electricity than something purpose built that actually cooled via a thermodynamic cycle

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Some additions to situation;
      >electricity is expensive
      >water is free
      >OP is poor
      Water has high heat capacity, wouldn't it make sense that several liters of it through a dense grill would cool the air significantly?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is your plan to just dump water down the drain? Pretty bold but whoever pays for your water will notice that you’ve been dumping thousands of gallons down the drain. There’s better methods of passive cooling than manchild-core ideas like this

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Is your plan to just dump water down the drain?
          Somewhat, I was thinking of either
          >have a container with small pump
          >wait until water heated up
          >replace water
          Or
          >control continuous inflow of water so it roughly equals the time it takes for it to heat up

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Just make a swamp cooler anon, it'll be easier and cheaper to set up, with the same electricity costs as a pump and a fan like you originally planned, but these things use evaporation to cool down the air.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The loading dock coolers seem to use a variation of this. I think the air blows instead of pulls (maybe to keep moisture from condensing on motor, blades ?)but they work. Evap for the win.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    + large thermal mass
    + large exchange surface area

    - properly sizing and controlling motor
    *a small computer pump may wear out faster then expected if the load is too much
    *pump controller would need adjusting, don't want it cooling too hard and condensing water around you CPU
    - chemical reactivity
    *You could get an odd mix of metals and fluids that don't play nice

    I've thought about this myself, I think it can be done but requires more planning then most realize. Although I ended up deciding to just get the bigger air cooler I could as I really don't want to have to worry about the fluid going bad. Seen too many liquid coolers get clogged up with bacteria/algae, although in fairness the people it happened to were also dumb so that likely played a role but the stuff I have seen is horrifying, am talking 30 gallons of slime oozing out of a sever rack bad. My new mad lad version of this is to replace the heat fins of air cooler with larger more conductive materials, but I've got no good reason to actually do it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >properly sizing and controlling motor
      Could probably cope with larger pump and timed on/off work?
      >chemical reactivity
      This is my main concern. I'm no PrepHole surgeon so I can't tell exactly how a car radiator would behave, or if the previous coolant mix that was used within would pose a problem

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Going with a larger pump is not a bad idea, just don't go too big. You just want to over come the resistance of the pipes but not build up too much pressure on one side, there might be more I'm not an expert.
        On/Off cycling is where a lot of wear happens. So you can adjust your setup so it doesn't consonantly turn on and off, and consider a variable speed motor that can ramp up slowly and might even support a soft start although that would likely add more things to figure out.

        I would absolutely flush it out as you don't want to deal with any previous coolant mix. If it's colorized they say to run the line till clear, although I would run it a lot more and consider hot water to rinse out anything left.

        Major types are Copper and Aluminum, avoid mixing them directly. Copper is expensive, so big ones tend to be Aluminum. I'm not sure how it works with running fluids. With old well pumps they would put a wooden pipe between the metals to separate them, but those hand pumps also didn't run that often so I wonder if the running fluid would still carry the charge.

        this covers some points

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This will work, but the amount of cooling you'll get depends solely on temp gradient. If your input water is 5-10C, great, if it's 20C and your room is 25C, not so great. Ideally you should have some way of dumping the heat from the coolant, like running a loop through a big underground water tank, or better yet, underground pipe loops that dump the heat into the soil. Or a heat pump, then you have made an AC.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    gouge... PolarCool Pro 36" Direct Drive Variable Speed Powder Coated Fan... definately possible... I know some dudes & chicks that work on loading docks (not at Nintendo)

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics. Any heat being dissipated through the coils and fins is just going right back into the local environment

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      does a fan with no radiator make you feel cooler ? ever heard of a water cooled ac system ?
      my car runs faster with ice in that intercooler box rather than just warm water.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah but those things are losing heat to the outside. If you have a radiator sitting inside then all energy is going to go inside

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I thought for a while it might be fun to couple a few old car radiators together, run a big ass hose through some land like 2-3 feet underground, and get a well pump or something to move the fluid around. I think a 90/10 water/glycol mix would be ok for corrosion resistance. Boom, redneck geothermal.

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