Building a Plane

Have any anons here built a kit plane before?
Theres a company that sells quick build kits of a ww1 plane (pic rel) for about $20k.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    or you could just buy a used single prop for around the same price

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i get that a used plane of similar specs is even cheaper, considering that engines can cost as much as the entire kit
      but when you build a plane you're fully in a position to customize it as much as you want, and you wouldn't be destroying all the work somebody else did on a plane by repainting it and changing things with it
      theres also just no used ww1 reproduction planes i know of, let alone a two seater

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >customize it as much as you want

        you don't seem to realize you can't fly a plane to the club

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i get that theyre not toys or pieces just to show off but anyone who isnt an autist can atleast see why someone would take pride in their own work

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i get that theyre not toys or pieces just to show off but anyone who isnt an autist can atleast see why someone would take pride in their own work

          fwiw most general aviation-oriented airports have monthly open houses where people bring out their planes to show off, because doing so allows them to claim some kind of tax deduction, so there actually IS some incentive to have something cool.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >i have to make it look like it went to Fiji and back, it's a tax thing

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm gonna need a reference for that. It sounds like a hobby and IRS tends to dislike claiming expenses for a hobby.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Hobby deductions seem to be a thing, but I'm honestly not sure how the whole thing works, it's just what I was told by aircraft owners at my local GA airport's monthly open house.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Hobby deductions seem to be a thing, but I'm honestly not sure how the whole thing works, it's just what I was told by aircraft owners at my local GA airport's monthly open house.

              What you are looking for is called the "Hobby Loss Rule". It seems to mean that you can claim the hobby expenses, but only to the gross income of the hobby. So, if I have a flying "hobby" (according to the IRS definition), I can claim those hobby expenses, but only up to the amount of gross income I received from that "hobby".
              >Be me
              >own plane
              >do cool/cringe stuff to it for open house at airport
              >also make money
              Let's say I am able to make 12000 in fees by doing pilot stuff in a year. At the end of the year, I can claim up to 12000 worth of my
              "hobby" expenses as a deduction.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not with that additude!
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Fitzpatrick_(pilot)

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Outside of cosmetics like changing your paint scheme, there are lots of restrictions on what kinds of modifications you can do on any aircraft including homebuilt/experimental planes and ultralights.
        Even where you might add something relatively commonplace and approved for use and manufactured by a bona-fide aeronautical parts manufacturer, there's a good chance you won't be able to safely/ legally just DIY its installation and go on your merry way.

        Technical problems with common mods-

        https://www.eaa.org/eaa/aircraft-building/builderresources/while-youre-building/building-articles/basic-construction/modifications-good-or-bad

        How regulations and restrictions affect mods, and vice versa...
        https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2018/may/07/aircraft-maintenance-explaining-experimental

        Basically the more leeway to frick around that you have with an experimental classification ( that many homebuilts flybunder), the less you are allowed to do with the plane as far as uses...and the more the airworthiness classification allows as far as uses like carrying passengers or doing commercial stuff, the more restricted you are in doing mods.

        IOW if you want to test your ideas and mods you can, but that will be all you're allowed to do and it will just be a test bed...same with converting a sport plane to a crop duster; its allowed but once you do it it's a crop duster and you can't legally use it as a sport plane until you change it back and re- certify it.

        When people try to do things like convert older commercial and military planes for sport use, add custom interiors, etc. the inspections and re-certifications and restrictions can be insanely expensive and even insurmountable. Even just re-powering an older plane with a modern engine can be more hassle than its worth....it's not like hot rods where you can just do whatever you want.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          i see, thank you for the information
          to that extent it seems better to have two different planes to fit different uses than to try and have a single plane that's supposed to do everything
          like a plane for aerobatics, crop dusting, and high ceiling flying, then a plane for normal flight and cross country

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            also going more off of what i said, as expensive as owning two planes might seem, i'd probably get by just fine co-owning these kit planes, especially if its something desirable like the ww1 plane i posted in the OP or some of the aerobatics planes i'm interested like the starduster two

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          theres a reference book for general construction practices and as long as you halfway follow that, youre justified

          t. a&p

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Been looking at that design for awhile myself, got to check it out at Oshkosh last year, seems solid. Building an airplane is not particularly difficult if you're not a moron (that is a big ask of this demographic), but does require some care/thought. It's worth looking at designs like the Affordaplane, which can be built for less than $10k. Other options are the Volksplane, and the TEAM Aircraft Mini-Max. If you're serious, I'd start by joining the facebook builders groups of designs you're interested in, as well as joining your local EAA chapter, which will enable you to connect with other builders in your area.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone got the pic of the crazy bastard who put wings on like a LandCruiser and then crashed it and died?

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When I was young I helped out with an aircraft build. We used something called "dope," fabric, and wood.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Butyrate dope. Not easy to find these days since aircraft has moved on to synthetic fabrics. Probably gives you super cancer when you inhale the fumes.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i don't have a death wish

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      then why the hell are you on PrepHole?
      jokes aside, theres really nothing to fear about building a plane as long as you do it right
      most kits come with a detailed manual, and as long as you get it properly inspected afterward theres not too much that can go wrong
      of course, you need a lot of knowledge beforehand since its not just a hobby you can jump straight into, but its not nearly as bad as you might think it is

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not him but if my car's engine fails I just pull over, a plane immediately becomes a deathtrap.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          if a plane's engine fails it becomes a glider
          no its not as easy to maneuver as a proper glider, but it doesnt mean death
          a skilled pilot could land a plane even if the engine cuts thousands of feet in the air without any damage to the plane, although most of the time it happens the plane sustains some level of damage
          most fatalities in plane crashes happen close to the ground with full engine power

          • 3 weeks ago
            sage

            >mfw boss really into planes
            >tells me about how his friend died in a plane accident
            >took all precautions, still died
            >boss continues his plane hobby like nothing

            It's dangerous. It will always be.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      then why the hell are you on PrepHole?
      jokes aside, theres really nothing to fear about building a plane as long as you do it right
      most kits come with a detailed manual, and as long as you get it properly inspected afterward theres not too much that can go wrong
      of course, you need a lot of knowledge beforehand since its not just a hobby you can jump straight into, but its not nearly as bad as you might think it is

      also, as unstable as the aircraft in the OP looks, even most modern looking ww2 planes which were plenty safe enough were also just made of fabric and wood

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        "Most" is an overstatement, with very few exceptions ( mostly bong planes) fabric covered military aircraft were being phased out by the beginning of WW2, the plane in your pic was developed in the early 1930s and pretty much everything that went on line after the late 30s were made for all metal construction, or at least had metal skins over wooden framing or were molded plywood like the DeHaviland Mosquito...the ply skin on tbose was covered with doped fabric but that was to keep water out.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          still, my point stands that its pretty safe

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Like 2 out of hundreds of models?

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