Benefits of making a separate Drone branch?

how do you see this concept? will it be the future due to easier mobility and better standards or is it a mistake due to lack of flexibility for local commanders?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They aren't taking drones away from other branches, they're adding a new branch specifically for drones

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A separate branch for the Air Force? You must be out of your mind, aircraft will never be anything more than a wing of the Army. If you wanted to separate the planes from the tanks you'd ruin all the flexibility and only add in unnecessary complexity to the chain of command.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But this was correct. That's why the navy still has airplanes. The airforce was only split from the army because of fear of rebellions against the government by the military.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >fear of rebellions against the government by the military
        This is the real reason every country had several branches, the extra cost and killchain delays are worth the security to the ruling class.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Its moronic. Drone operators are primarily organic to the squad/platoon, while it would certainly be sensible to centralize and standardize drone operator training pipeline, to have them be their own branch would be like having medics or mortars be their own branch.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The best justification I've heard is that this is meant to remove the drone operators from under the direct control of old Soviet trained officers who had no idea how to handle or supply them and would give them dumb orders and waste them on dangerous frontline assignments.

      Instead you get operators from the Drone Force attached to army units, working with them but ultimately answerable to their own Drone Force chain of command if someone tries to send them on an assault.

      It's worse than if they were able to be seamlessly integrated, but it's reflecting the idea that drones are so super special important to the conflict that they need a command structure 100% devoted to them, even if it creates a redundant extra layer to interface with.

      >detect drones in your area
      >launch AI-powered drone with phased-array of very sensitive antennas
      >it homes in on the drone
      >when close it enough, it discerns between emissions of the drone itself, and the ground operator
      >it flies towards the drone operator, homing in on the signal
      >it crashes into the drone operator and explodes, killing him instantly
      why wouldnt this work?

      >operator is sitting in a basement with a wire running up to the roof

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Apparently drones get hit by friendly fire a lot when the drone operator can’t be found in time so some more structure would go a long way towards preventing that.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    more importantly, what should it be called?

    DRONE COMMAND?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Remote Attended Deathsquads
      RAD

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      DFA, Death From Above

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Reddit

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    CLANKER BROS, WE ARE SO BACK

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Inherent in drone tech, and specifically inherent in Ukrainian systems is greater flexibility for local commanders. Delta pretty much integrates with everything and would be what is used for intel and communications regardless, so the Drone Force will be as receptive to every other force and vice versa.

    Zalulzhny is still a hero and popular, I don't know if he is the head of drone force, but maybe that will encourage Ukes to sign on. It will give what Ukraine intends for it's drone capability a clearer funding path and in terms of leadership structure greater clarity.
    It also reflects the current reality that these things are used primarily as support and are expected to be responsive and fly/roll/dive in whereever they are needed, but will begin to properly carry out and lead their own operations in the very near future.

    If this isn't already inferred, something to watch out for is a combined arms operation supported by elements of air land and sea.... that is completely comprising of drones.
    There are definitely some scenarios where it will just be plain easier to carry out ops where the enemy is the one with the flesh.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >will it be the future due to easier mobility and better standards
    Easier mobilisation and lower standards anon. All those twinks and fatties can go in the gamer pit, who cares if they get blisters and collapse if they have to walk a mile.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    we're in PEAK DRONE right now and im just waiting for the market correction.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      there's a non-zero chance that it's just drones from here on out

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think this is the kind of thing that depends more on the execution than the principle of it, it either leads to a flexible, agile and innovative force able to act where it's needed or it takes away organic UAV support for little gain, I'm leaning towards being favorable to the decision, drones are not just the small tactical drones we see in kill compilations, they can be strategic assets with high level impacts as we see by the deep strikes on important logistic targets and being restricted to an organic support role is too limiting.

        Drones aren't going away, but it only takes one good counter to instantly render drones cost ineffective and then their main advantage is lost.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          On the US side you have Starlink which can't be jammed.
          You could do dronespam with cheap Shahed tier shit and control them from another continent.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's the fun part, Ukraine's drone program is the most advanced and successful in the world, because it is the most experienced at dealing with counter-measures. Everyone else is behind the curve. They have been dealing with severe counter-measures since 2014.

      Which is why if you have an ear for these things, the collective west has begun creaming itself as Ukes have been teasing unseen new land drone capability.

      Incidentally, the spring mud season is soon. It's always so so so difficult for vehicles to traverse ground and undertake assaults in mud season, because troopers and crew are always so so heavy and they need armour on the vehicle to protect them and soviet vehicles don't have enough armour so they need armour added which means the already underpowered engine is strained... and so on and so on...

      What if that wasn't a problem any more?

      You could lead quite major assaults if everything was light enough to skip over the mud, right?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why are fentanyl addicted westerners living vicariously through little russians? Russia has had just as much experience with drones as NATOs army in the Ukrainian region, the hands on experience is fairly equal.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The difference is that Ukrainians learn from experience and Russians don't from what we've seen, to say nothing of corruption. Forgive us for not being confident about the side still using human waves in the 21st century.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >human waves
            You need motivation for human waves, something forcibly mobilized ukros don't have.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Us? Who are you speaking on behalf of. They're both east slavs, there is absolutely zero fundamental difference between the two sans propensity towards nazism. Maybe NATO will learn but they have much inflexibility, they're been trying to treat everything like a lamer version of nam since the 70's

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Ukrainians and Russians are one and the same shitpie cut in two by the wheel of history.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              you may as well argue that English and French are one and the same shitpie cut in two by the wheel of history. Or that Bashkirs, Tatars, Chuvashs and Russians are one and the same.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Scots and English are one and the same
              frick it
              Scots, Irish and English are one and the same

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >and Russians don't
            It's not that they don't learn, they just don't live long enough to pass it down
            Ukraine has lots of people who defended Kharkiv, fought for Severodonetsk, moved to liberate Kherson, got back fighting for Bakhmut, sent to help storm Robotyne, rotated into Avdiivka and now chilling somewhere in Kherson making potshots on russian on other side of a river. And on every step they learned something new, and teached it to someone else.
            On the russian side... well, you can say there are units that come the same way, but with casualties rates in 30% at minimum, they were basically completely new people every second deployment.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >to say nothing of corruption
            I can understand why you wouldn't want to say anything about it, given how bad it is.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >detect drones in your area
    >launch AI-powered drone with phased-array of very sensitive antennas
    >it homes in on the drone
    >when close it enough, it discerns between emissions of the drone itself, and the ground operator
    >it flies towards the drone operator, homing in on the signal
    >it crashes into the drone operator and explodes, killing him instantly
    why wouldnt this work?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      A real military would have AWACS, satellites and ground SIGINT picking up those signals and relaying the coordinates to artillery/CAS instead of cramming a gorillion expensive antennas into a kamikaze drone

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It would work against a LOS drone. However you might only blow up near an antenna that is a hundred meters away from the actual operator who is in an underground foxhole.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Making a separate branch for drones is like making a separate branch for recon or artillery. You COULD do that and gimp your army (because organic support will always be better than having to go cross-service) if you want to achieve a political goal. For example, if your army is doing badly, but drones are doing a lot of work, you may decide it’s politically best to have a separate service which can report battlefield successes instead of losses, It won’t change the fact that you’re losing and in fact will just make things worse, but that’s not the only cosideration at play at the leadership level.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >lack of flexibility for local commanders
    Leaning towards this. The added bureaucratic weight doesn't seem particularly worth it for something that could just be done by existing branches anyway. It's like giving ATGMs its own branch.
    You could do this if you wanted to split chain of command but it makes coordination harder, not easier.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Whole this drone warfare is possible only because of aliexpress.
    CCP can decide they're not allowing export of those parts anymore and whole thing would shut down within a month.
    Same reason why we're not seeing any commercial chink drones like DJI Agras. They're export restricted by CCP and have built in e-fuse that blows if it get gnss lock inside war zone.
    So idk making a branch that is this depended on import of consumables...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >have built in e-fuse that blows if it get gnss lock inside war zone
      [citation needed]

      >Same reason why we're not seeing any commercial chink drones like DJI Agras
      that's not the reason as you can easily order gigantic agrar drones (payload 40kg) from aliexpress

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >branch
    moronic
    >school that specializes in developing tactics, requirements and future uses
    Big brain

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Benefits
    So you can put in charge the main Warhammer 40k fan who will pray to Omnissiah

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Systematic training, maintenance, gear and doctrines development.
    It's to the experience of all small separated teams to accumulate in one place, be analyzed and passed back down to everyone.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen more than a few stories about Ukrainian drone operators who aren't even technically in the army, they just wheel around the frontline like privateers doing shit of their own accord, specifically saying they don't want to deal with military bureaucracy.
    A separate brunch is basically just a means to legalize those guys without spooking them.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      "What's up youtube, please subscribe and donate so I can buy more drones which helps me kill more mobiks"

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      "What's up youtube, please subscribe and donate so I can buy more drones which helps me kill more mobiks"

      This timeline is officially SAVED

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You want drone doctrine guys to train your drone dudes and innovative useful drones.

    The danger is creating a drone "air force" that pretends it isn't part of the army and doesn't need to support the army and instead can frick off and be useless.

    A drone is a platoon level mortar section. It is part of that infantry squad. This can't be forgotten.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >He doesn't know that Ukraine was a pioneer in the use of drone warfare

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Has a drone done something similar yet? And I don't mean as a secondary effect.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's obviously to standardize training and research. Also makes budgeting easy easier.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Kinda like other militaries medical corps.

    Yeah you got field hospital and surgeons, in that case you'd get logistic and R&D instead.

    But you also got the medic attached to platoons/squads/whatever going in the field. Same logic for the drone operator.

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