Becoming black powder-pilled

Dumb question: Can you cast bullets out of non-lead metals for black powder shooting? Im talking pewter for example

Im debating between a remington 1858 from pietta or an colt dragoon from uberti for my first rural blaster replica

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You can cast bullets out of just about anything. Lead, copper, silver, gold, aluminum, pewter. However, all of them will have different performance.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No clue about pewter, but lead is the breasts cuz the boolets have to be soft and malleable to load and go down the barrel. Just food for thought. Most bullets are lead with a dash of tin for that nice sheen and makes them cast easier. Heard lotta people sub tin for pewter in the recipe though, but never pewter rounds.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      oh, disclaimer (why i lead with the no clue[haha, get it, lead]) ive never casted any myself but research the crap outta shit im interested in and thats just what ive seen.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Can you? Probably. I'm not sure why you'd want to though. You're spending more money for something that's probably harder to cast, probably harder to load, and at best is going to be about as ballistically efficient.

      I use scratch and dent thrift shop pewter to sweeten up my alloy (it's cheaper than tin) but that's for smokeless. I wouldn't waste good alloy for a cap and ball revolver. Lead's cheaper and easier. Straight lead casts just fine without tin but you have to run the mold a little hotter.

      antimony is the best alloy for bullets, although its basically just harder lead
      and while you can shoot most metals out of a single shot muzzleloader, do NOT use anything other than lead or antimony in a black powder revolver, you WILL have a chain fire
      only lead can be used because its soft enough to be pushed into a smaller diameter hole than the diameter of the projectile and seal the powder inside, if you cant do this with other types of metals they arent safe, and the flash of your shot can and will set off powder under the bullet in another cylinder, or in the worst case scenario, all cylinders at once, which will lead to a suprise amputation of your hand
      theyre common enough occurances that ive seen multiple people have chain fires with blanks that have been packed down solidly with a very dense and thick wad, which since they were blanks they only left light burns on their hands
      and even if you think "oh well its a one in a thousand chance" its not a chance you should take if a non-lead bullet is just gonna perform like shit on top of that threat

      Every single thing that you typed there was incorrect on some level. Bravo, sir. The next time that you're going to offer advice on a topic that you know absolutely nothing about, fricking Google it first or something.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    yes you can cast bullets out of anything if you have the furnace and patience to handle the melting temperatures. your projectiles will be shitty and light with less dense metals like pewter. theres a reason people use lead

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Can you cast bullets out of non-lead metals for black powder shooting?
    Absolutely.
    The question is why you would want to. Most molds are designed for the shrinakage rates of lead and won't cast the correct diameter if you change alloys. Also, most other alloys are simultaneously harder to cast and ballistically inferior to lead.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >ballistically inferior to lead.
      Velocity is king. Velocity will ALWAYS be king. Velocity now, velocity FOREVER

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    antimony is the best alloy for bullets, although its basically just harder lead
    and while you can shoot most metals out of a single shot muzzleloader, do NOT use anything other than lead or antimony in a black powder revolver, you WILL have a chain fire
    only lead can be used because its soft enough to be pushed into a smaller diameter hole than the diameter of the projectile and seal the powder inside, if you cant do this with other types of metals they arent safe, and the flash of your shot can and will set off powder under the bullet in another cylinder, or in the worst case scenario, all cylinders at once, which will lead to a suprise amputation of your hand
    theyre common enough occurances that ive seen multiple people have chain fires with blanks that have been packed down solidly with a very dense and thick wad, which since they were blanks they only left light burns on their hands
    and even if you think "oh well its a one in a thousand chance" its not a chance you should take if a non-lead bullet is just gonna perform like shit on top of that threat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      my bad, linotype alloy, not pure antimony
      linotype is an alloy of 95% lead and 5% antimony, and sometimes tin is added

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Chainfires have nothing to do with bullet material, and everthing to do with casting the right diameter bullets.
      You mean well, but you don't even know what Anitimony actually is. You should stop giving advice.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i said antimony because i was half asleep, i know i'm moronic
        but how are you gonna create a decent seal on the bullet without lead? most metals are too hard to press into the cylinder chambers

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You could - but why?

    If you're thinking you have some shortcut to cheaper and easier bullets than lead, you don't and it's not worth pursuing that moronic idea. Lead is incredible stuff and it's easy to obtain on the cheap from old roof flashing or wheel weights. And harder metals are liable to damage your barrel.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The open top Colt's have a lot of style but Uberti struggles with QC and getting the arbor length (controls cylinder gap) right. I'd get an 1858, it seems like the modern manufacturers get that on right way more often. There is a good chance your new spaghetti blaster will require some fiddling with to get right. You also may want to look into making your own caps. Casting bullets is fun, and even making your own BP is within reach. Welcome to the sickness

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Here is my 1858 I cut down to 4" for carrying in a belt holster

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The short arbor is easy enough to correct with a spacer, but you're right - the fricking Italians should've figured this out already, but they're the same buttholes that thought that shortening the gas ring on the #3's wouldn't be a problem. (When an engineer, Italian or otherwise, tells you that something won't be a problem, what they usually mean is that it won't be *their* problem.) 1858 is probably the better choice if you're thinking of a cartridge conversion in the future, or just don't want to have to frick with the thing as much to get it to work right. But since we're talking BP here...
      >1858 is unironically worse with bp than most of the colts because s&w got the arbor wrong
      >fortunately more lube fixes almost everything in the world of bp, including this

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I experienced cylinder drag on my Uberti 1858 after 36 rounds of 30 grains Pyrodex in a shooting session. Started squirting it on the arbor with moosemilk (1 part Ballistol, 8 parts water) between cylinders and no problem ever again. The 58 pops my home made caps with authority, I keep the mainspring tension on the tight side. My worst cap and ball revolver is a Colt 2nd gen pocket pistol from the 70s. That thing is a jam o matic

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          This, although it's more of a corrective action for after the fact. We want to delay that from becoming necessary for as long as possible by
          >greased felt wads
          >greased projectiles
          >pack arbor with as much grease as it will hold
          >stop shooting fricking pyrodex
          >consider trying swiss

          It's not magic. Swiss = less fouling to start with. If there's enough lube being introduced with each shot to keep the existing fouling slimy, each new shot will blow some of it out. If everything's done correctly, it reaches a point where it won't accumulate more fouling and can still power through what's not being blown off.

          Different designs make this easier or harder to achieve. A sufficiently large gas ring keeps the fouling out of the arbor. A large diameter arbor makes it more resistant to fouling. Grooves on the arbor hold more grease to prevent the ingress of fouling. The Colt open tops get most or all of these correct, the 1858 not so much.

          But worst case scenario, yeah, just hit it with Ballistol and that'll get it going again.
          >also works with suppressed rimfires when they get so crudded up that they start jamming

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I am a big fan of the greased felt wads, they make cleanup a lot easier. I make mine with 50/50 bees wax and beef tallow soaked wads I punch from 1/8" wool felt I got off eBay. I heard the lanolin in the wool helps fight the fouling too.

            Lots of anons use mobil 1 red hi temp grease inside the action wear spots and arbor and that has worked for me

            I agree Pyrodex smells, fouls, and potentially corrodes like total shit, but I use it for my Italian pistols because they

            I save Swiss for BP cartridge loading for my 45-70 trapdoor and break action revolver 38 s&w because antiques deserve something better than Pyrodex.

            Anybody have ideas for getting free or cheap LEAD for casting?

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              *Because they are repops and not going to be collectible

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >cheap lead
              Keep an eye peeled. When I first started casting ~30 years ago, I used to hit all of the local tire shops once a month and pick up their wheel weights at no cost. They'd actually thank me for taking them off their hands and would generally let me keep the buckets that they were collected in. Not pure lead, but a great alloy for smokeless. Then the buttholes in Olympia changed the law and made that illegal, but I'd gathered so much that I'm still using it.

              As for pure lead, I've had luck at estate sales (very cheap or sometimes free) and thrift shops and the like. Look for old dive weights or roof flashing on Craigslist and such. We have a scrapyard at the edge of town that I've bought from before when spot is low; the guy that runs it is usually happy enough to sell anything he has to me if I offer him more than what his normal buyer is trying to lowball him for, although that lead tends to need a lot of cleaning.

              If all else fails, Rotometals usually has fair prices and they're used to dealing with bullet casters, so they're not going to sell you trash.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Thanks for the lead scrapping tips anon, I know about being at mercy of Olympia's homosexualry

                Dive weights are awesome, I found one at a local yard sale and it was full of pure lead #7 shot I have been reloading my black powder cowboy shot shells with it for the past year.

                Will check out rotometals of all else fails

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Who makes the best BP repros? Had a Pietta 1851 Navy years and years ago and it was okay but ended up selling it. I want to get another BP revolver though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The best is Ruger Old Army, no contest, but it isn't a true repro, like all Rugers it's their design. I'd say Uberti and Pietta are in the tie for highly functional 1858s in 44 or 36 caliber. The Uberti is fine with no gay markings on the barrel

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've been considering getting a matchlock. Would it be a better idea to get a .74 cal Veterans Arms repro or a genuine 19th century .48 cal Japanese Tanegashima? I understand one has way more history but I'd like something I can shoot and not fear that I'm damaging a piece of history, plus the Veterans Arms repro has a stock and is significantly cheaper

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      XIX century steel is shit compared to anything modern. XIX century Japanese steel is even shitter. I wouldn't risk running full loads through such gun.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    uberti are way better. pietta have gay warnings on the barrel.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    98%Sn lead free Pewter is about 18 bucks a pound right now, lead is likely cheaper. And actually performs better. And that's when I buy at least 50lbs of it from a wholesaler that I have to pay buy mailing physical checks to. It'll run over $20/lbs shipped from any online retailer especially if you aren't buying in bulk. Tin will also eventually corrode thin mild steel pots and leak all over your table. It's worse in every way for bullets

    t. Miniatures caster and black powder haver

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Lead's under $3/lb right now on Rotometals. Alloys with antimony and/or tin are actually a bit cheaper, but that's only because there's a sale going on. It's actually under $2/lb if you're willing to buy in bulk, but they won't deliver in those quantities unless you have a forklift and a loading dock.
      >starts researching zoning requirements for a loading dock in the back yard

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pewter traditionally had lead in it. A lot of lead. Where would you be getting large amounts of pewter to melt down? Because it probably has lead.

    Just use lead. It's not plutonium.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Go for the 1858. I have one and a colt 1851 navy, both from pietta, and I favor the 58. The sights are better, the gun seems heavier and more stable, and the cylinder quick swap is a neat feature for a BP gun.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anon, did invite the sexy goth vampire girl into your home after I EXPRESSLY told you not to. Fine, go make a silver ball and get rid of her already before she sucks you dry.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Oh no its an Oblivion vampire

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >oh no! I dropped my MONSTER dragon scroll I use for my MANGUM big titty goth gf

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Dragoon all day my man. Dragoon is
    1. Big
    2. Fun
    3. Heavy
    4. Cool
    5. Uberti
    Only better choice is a Walker

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    at a leisurely pace, 1858 with a loading stand ~80 shots in a 2h session
    an open top colt, using its lever or dismantling it every time - probably like 50 shots a session

    colts are cooler guns - looks, media, history, but you have to be into that shit to forgive the shortcomings. and then there are subjective things, like at what point fiddling with the thing stops being fun and becomes pain, how intensively do you plan to use it, etc. 1858 is a safe bet, and eventually you'll probably have both.

    the quality between pietta and uberti seems to go back and forth, currently with pietta being on the top. doesn't mean shit won't break, getting a spare parts kit just in case isn't such a bad idea. also hoard some caps. the drought last time lasted 2 years, their production gets lower priority than regular ammo.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i got one of those cap makers from 22reloader during that time. it worked good. used multiple things for the armstrong mix. used the mix that he sells which works the best but also used homemade armstrong mix made with match heads and ground up red phosphorus strip material. that also worked pretty well. some anon here turned me onto using duco cement over the armstron mix which was a helpful tip as it helped seal the mixture in. all in all the cap shortage sucked, but tbh its pretty much a non issue nothingburger.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        nice, didn't know you can use phosphorus/matches. i remember checking 22reloads, but their mixture would land me on a "no fun allowed" list in euroland.

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if you're gonna get a black powder revolver for the first time, get a steel frame 1858 remington army
    the brass frame ones will warp over time, though generally negligible, after enough shooting, it'll happen; same thing with any revolvers without a topstrap
    other than that, the 1858 design is pretty much the best you're generally gonna get

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. No Uberti arbor frickery, no worries about frame stretch, it just works...except when it doesn't anyway. The experience you gain dealing with fouling and the occasional cap jam are directly translatable to other C&B's and BP in general. It's also a better candidate for a cartridge conversion when you're ready for BP's final form.

      >1858 design is pretty much the best you're generally gonna get
      If you're sticking with C&B, sure, but that's not the only option for BP. Something like a SAA is an even better design, and while the repros are checked out for smokeless, they were designed to run on BP. As much fun as C&B is, BP cartridges are just as fun without the hassles.

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