Are you gothic arch pilled? >stronger than conventional equivalent. >less material

Are you gothic arch pilled?

>stronger than conventional equivalent
>less material
>easier to put up building (standing arches)
>flexible design
>make huge buildings without large timber
>very diyable

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i rent a 6k sqft one cheap and it's a giant piece of shit
    >can't get things close to the walls
    >roof leaks and it's too steep to get on and fix
    >it has half blown down twice in the last 15 years
    >creaks and flexes like your mom's bed as it warms up in the morning, hence the roof leaks
    >low rafter stringers always in the way
    >built buy a cheap Black person dutch dairy farmer of course
    >impossible to remodeling efficiently
    i could go on and on. just build a pole barn like a white man instead

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Talk about wasted space…who keeps a piece of shit scraper inside?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        beats working on them out in the rain and mud

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Talk about wasted space…who keeps a piece of shit scraper inside?

        If you have the room why wouldn't you keep your equipment shedded?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          this made equipment owners shed and fard themselves

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Wow that is a terrible shape. more like a Quonset hut

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >pic rel
        Literally me. I even got a rose-quarts from her. Damn, why do I miss her so much.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Rose quartz is nice, hang on to it. You can use it as a reference hardness tester for mohs 7 by scratching other samples with it. Anything harder is likely to be a gemstone

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Damn, didn't know, thank you Anon!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >can't get close to walls
      This is definitely a downside with any curved wall building. Building the structure on a small pony wall helps, but adds cost.
      >creaks flex, low rafters, blew down
      I'm no engineer but the building looks poorly designed. First it's a straight up round arch. The top of that building is gonna want to hinge with any load from up top, which I imagine most of the load it encounters comes from (aside from wind). It's probably already pretty strong side to side, so removing rafters and replacing with braced cables would help the hinging affect (could move them way up too). Also that connection to hold the two pieces of truss together made me chuckle. 2 screws and a strap ain't gonna cut it lol.

      One more thing I noticed is that the trusses look like 4 foot centers and pretty damn thin. For a building that size I think some sturdier laminated trusses would be in order.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Oh I forgot to respond to this

      >pole barn
      Pole barns have been around since we haven't needed big loft barns for loose hay. They work adequately, and can be pretty strong and cost effective to put up. My main gripe about them is the decrease in material quality with permanent wood foundation treatments (I think the preservative restrictions are a local canadian thing, pretty sure burgers don't have the same laws). I can't buy foundation wood that is going to survive for more than a couple decades until it rots completely through. This leaves doing post frame with a cement foundation, which kind of defeats the purpose of a pole barn all together with the added cost and complexity.

      Pole barns are built these days to extremely shitty specs and I see then blow down all the time in my area.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >post frame
        do you understand what makes a pole barn a pole barn and not a stick built?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          forgor pic

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your probably confused about me say pwf. Pwf includes solid columns for post frame, or laminated columns with 2x6/2x8. Pwf here is the treatment standard.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >cheap
      >it's a giant piece of shit

      GEE

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You payed more than a million dollars over 15 years? For a building you hate and look down on?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >rent a 6k sqft one cheap
        >6k sqft
        >six thousand square feet
        >cheap

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        lol not even close

        >rent a 6k sqft one cheap
        >6k sqft
        >six thousand square feet
        >cheap

        it's $500/mo and i get thrown out from july until the middle of winter while the owner stores harvested grass seed inside. there's no power or lighting and thousands of holes in the roof so it rains inside. it's one step above working under a big blue tarp, which is zanadu compared to the average repair site as a mobile mechanic. i just like to b***h

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >not taking the lamella/zollinger roof pill

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      that is pretty badass

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >lamella
      everyone is going to pretend they didn't see this post.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >joints made out of tiny strips of plywood

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You can laminate as big of arches as you want. You could build a glulam arch you could hang a tank off

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What advantages (if any) over a conventional half round quonset? Other than a higher peak which is the most unusable part of the height i see no other real difference.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sidewalls are more vertical, building looks much better, easier to build using straight lumber, more appropriate for religious serves.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's likely capable of supporting a slightly higher snow load. Other than that, not much of a difference really.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    how many types of arch are there?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is the 21st Century, Anon. Use catenary arches if you want that sort of thing.

      A bunch. Besides a wide variety of stylistic arches for decorative purposes, there are several for structural purposes. A circular arch is best suited for withstanding isostatic pressure from the outside, as in a tunnel built through loose/weak material that needs to be reinforced, or which must withstand ground water pressure. A parabolic arch is most suited to situations where the arch needs to support a downward load which is even over horizontal units of distance, as in an open-spandrel arch bridge. A catenary arch is most suited to situations where the arch is primarily supporting its own weight. A lancet (Gothic) arch is a decent approximation of catenary and parabolic arches (much closer than the circular arches in classical and Romanesque construction), so they allowed more efficient, lighter structures like cathedrals. But nowadays, people know how to properly engineer structures.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Is there any benefit to nailing flat lengths onto the arch to exploit its structural stability so that you can more simple affix long corrugated roofing sheets to it? Because the curve is a problem to work around.
        I can see this would create some increased air gaps between the frame and the water proofing and increase the height a little affecting the wind behaviour.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Corrugated roofing sheets are flexible in the non-corrugated direction (and can often be bent in other directions too), and so can bend to conform to a curved arch. Such a bend can greatly increase the span capacity of the panel, as in pic related. OP's pic uses flat facets on the arch because the OSB panels it uses for sheathing aren't flexible like that.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            True I guess for steel or polymer/tar, but not fibrecrete panels

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              *and it would cause a lot of issues for snow.
              Which is why I wondered how well you could bolt an external frame to it that holds a flat roof panel on

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You don't want the corrugations running horizontally, that will just create toughs that hold water.

            *and it would cause a lot of issues for snow.
            Which is why I wondered how well you could bolt an external frame to it that holds a flat roof panel on

            >how well you could bolt an external frame to it that holds a flat roof panel on
            Shouldn't be a problem at all, that doesn't really effect the underlying structure. However it's not really necessary as that structure is basically just a bunch of flats arranged in an arch-like configuration. Should be able to just panel it, with overlapping joints at each change in angle. Might even be able to crease the panels at those locations since they are such slight angles.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >that will just create toughs that hold water.
              If you take a close look at the pic I referenced, you'll see horizontal corrugations on the steep areas and vertical corrugations on the areas with shallow slope, so as to minimize both water holding and requirements for machine bending of panels.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              What is this arch being used for?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                A roof.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Style framing shown is the ancient Quonset or Nissen style. Torch cutting then rotating the beam sections at left was a slick touch.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            oven in the summer, thats why i couldnt live here you need proper insulation

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not an engineer and not an architect, but running those panels horizontally, isn't going to work in snowy regions. That fricking thing could trap literally TONS of ice and snow on the roof.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Engineer here. Semi circles are ok. The ridge doesn't trap enough snow to counter the beneficial lateral support effect of sheet metal running in the longitudinal direction.
              Semi circle 8 is not as effective as roof trusses in heavy snowfall locations.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Show us yours.

    Wood is for campfires. It rots (no more serious copper or arsenic is why), bugs eat it and you cannot weld it. Like balloon framing it's a fire trap.

    Military and industry and modern farmers solved that shit long ago with variations on quonset huts then their superior trussless replacements. Everything that PrepHole asks about is solved but noobs crave spoonfeeding.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How well does an arch type system compare against a standard flat sided shed built with I beams?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If we're talking about strength and rigidity, it really depends on the engineering of that specific structure. You can't just make a blanket-statement that X construction method is stronger than Y construction method. You have to take into account things like column spacing, beam sizes, joist/beam spans, lateral bracing, connection methods, etc. which is different from building to building.

      If we're talking about practicality, vertical walls are always going to be better as it maximizes usable interior space. With an arch that goes all the way to the floor like in OP's pic, the further you go towards the sides the lower the ceiling becomes. Also with vertical walls you have places to mount things like wall cabinets, tool racks, etc. but with an arch that is much more limited.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      frick off macgay

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    what is this arch called?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      absolutely halal

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      crashing under snowload arch

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The Fishmouth

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      the struggling garden center

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The harbor freight Deluxe

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    make it wide, cover with rubber or plastig and a layer of earth and grow some grass or a lien

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just ordered half a lift of 1x4 to make some laminated trusses.

    Wish me luck anons

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    looks like a fun way to waste construction material

    that thing is useless. I guess it was fun to build, but still as useful as a cardbox castle

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