Are old vinyl players worth repairing?

I have two garrads from the 60s and some weird nikko dl-2 full automatic turntable. They do feach at least 100 bucks if working, but all of mine have broken glass covers. Any tips on how to make one, and if they are worth trying to fix

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    2 are missing a needle

    • 1 month ago
      Bepis

      Damn that sucks.

      Vinyl made a big comeback in recent years though. See if it’s worth your time by googling similar models selling right now. If it is, throw em on OfferUp-CL-Faceberg Mktplc

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Damn that sucks.
        Jesus is everyone in this thread larping? Nobody who gives a damn about a vinyl record would allow a 40 year old needle anywhere near their shit. If OP's crap doesn't support standard high quality replacement needles then they are pure toys.

        Having said that, vinyl is for hipsters and no one else. Vinyl sucks in every way compared to digital whatever.

        t. old fart who spent many dollars on vinyl and quality turntables before you were born. actually owned pic related which you have never heard of. it had this magical liquid and fancy fibers that would make your record pristine if you used it every time. And they still wore out because vinyl sucks.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          LAST whups D3's ass. Bought my first TT at Sound of Music. 'Member them? Now they're called Best Buy.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Don't reply to the literal worst tripgay on this board. He shits up every fricking thread and comments on shit he has 0 knowledge in.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          > vinyl is for hipsters

          Hipsters haven’t existed for at least a decade.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            So hip, they stopped existing before everyone else.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Most people who buy vinyl nowadays are dipshits who like it for the a e s t h e t i c. They don’t care about quality, they don’t care about gear. They don’t care about keeping their records in good shape aside from not creasing the jackets. 80% of the time they never listen to them. But they buy that shit up because it’s something to collect that they can post about on tiktok that shows what great taste they have. It’s funko pops for hipsters and now single lp releases are $40-50. They’re buying vintage tables at yard sales and using a 50 year old needle that’s never been changed with 10,000 hours on it. or they’re buying a shitty $15 chinese plastic bullshit turntable from target for $100 where there’s no counterweight so they end up taping pennies to the headstock and thrashing their records with 5 grams of tracking force. Go into a record shop and guarantee you’ll see a sign about how you can’t return a “defective record” unless it doesn’t play on the shop table because there are so many of these fricking morons

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends whats wrong with them
    Dust covers dont matter that much

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    those old designs where you piled a bunch of records on and it dropped them one at a time are curious mechanical designs but are hot garbage to anyone who cares about their records.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends entirely on the table. I sometimes refurbish tables if I can find good ones at estate sales or flea markets or whatever but finding good ones is the hard part. People think any “vintage” table is worth a shit but I find most people back in the day were cheap as frick and bought the bargain bin shit that sucked then and still sucks now. You can bother to restore that if you want; some dipshit hipster kids will still buy it because they will insist anything “vintage” is better even though an shitty entry level audio technica table for like $150 will outperform it in every conceivable metric.
    Restoring them is generally easy. Take apart, clean, lube, replace belts. Replacing belts can mean you might need to size belts and find your own, not the hardest thing. Repair gets a bit tougher for automatic turntables in the 80s/90s era but still not very hard, then it’s just basic digital circuits and generally all through hole stuff that’s very easy to work on.
    Fixing/making dust covers is actually probably the hardest part. For fixing small chips and cracks I use epoxy. The cracks I treat like a car windshield: I cover the crack with tape then fill the crack with resin from a syringe and cure with uv. The chips I just fill and smooth out with a spreader. Then sand and buff until it looks good. Chips usually are pretty much gone with this method but cracks are still visible, they just stop spreading. No clue how to make them, at least not in a way that doesn’t look like shit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Note that I do this because it’s kind of interesting and not because it’s lucrative. It’s somewhat profitable but only because I’ve learned what tables are valuable, how to take pictures, where to sell/advertise them, I’ve gained rep as a restoration person (the biggest piece), etc. and even then it’s not really worth it because the internet exists now. So the person running the estate sale sees the thorens td 160 can sell on ebay for $1000 and wants $700 for it even though the ones on ebay are immaculate and theirs is not working and disgusting. I used to be able to get that for like 1-200 tops, maybe less, and resell for like 800

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This.

        I have restored a few tts, and they take forever to sell. If they ever sell. Other old equipment that used to be much more valuable : reel to reel, any tape deck or stereo that isn’t TOTL, 8mm projectors. VCRs are weird only a few are really valued, and they are so old now that anything good probably needs recapped which is expensive and time consuming.

        Second hand market is kind of fricked for last 5+ years.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Vinyl disks last very long so you could sell that shit to vinyl enjoyers

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They get damaged every time they play.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      A clever dick might find a way to read vinyl records with a laser beam or two. Get on it homosexuals.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This exists but it costs a lot and your lps have to be super clean

        https://www.elpj.com/

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No anons are pointing out that capacitors dry out. I have a 40 year old Denon that is mechanically fine but needs a recap, not too many places can do this, so I will probably just replace, but why, digital with a good DAC is better.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That old shit doesn’t have caps in it

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >They do feach at least 100 bucks if working
    lol
    lmao even

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Are old vinyl players worth repairing?
    >They do feach at least 100 bucks if working

    That depends on how much you think your time is worth.

    Do the math... (potential revenue from sale - material/purchase expenses) / expected number of hours of work required = potential hourly income

    What's the minimum hourly income you would find acceptable? $25? $35? $50? If it's below what you'd accept for your time then do something else that's more worthwhile.

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