Any weapons to combat this?

Any weapons to combat this?

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Clusterbombs and following it up with napalm or willy.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Best in the whole world air defense could help.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    moron here

    what's the point of hitting crimea? there's a tiny passable bottleneck to the penisula making any attack to or from crimea basically impossible

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Turns out that it doesn't matter on which front you kill S-400, you still kill S-400

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Crimea contains a whole bunch of naval bases, air bases, air defence. There's also the symbolic value of rendering Russia's cassus belli (the conflict kicked off with Russia seizing Crimea) untenable.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Free hits

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Logistics and the naval war
      Ukraine has effectively won the war on the sea even though their entire navy of 2 ships was sunk in the opening 24h

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They scuttled them themselves, is important to mention.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Russia is willing to keep throwing valuable military hardware into it.
      It's like Japan attacking Midway. They barely cared at all about Midway island itself. It was chosen because they knew the US Navy would sally out to defend it (to Japan's detriment, as it turned out)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      there's little depth to AA there - AA systems cannot be as physically close to each other and help each other out as they can be up north, so they're easier to whittle down.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Most intelligent post ITT. Defending coastal airspace is very hard.

        [...]
        [...]
        [...]
        [...]
        [...]
        >there's a tiny passable bottleneck to the penisula making any attack to or from crimea basically impossible
        Every army who took the penninsula in the modern period has also taken Crimea.
        You're forgetting about the deadliest weapon of all, one that has laid low countless armies since time immemorial. Ukraine need not cross the penninsula to take Crimia, nor fire a weapon across it once they gain it, as long as the bridge is also gone.

        Crimea has ONE (1) source of water, and it is the canal passing through the penninsula. 85% of Crimea relies on it for their water and agriculture.
        It was the first thing Ukraine cut off in 2014 after Russia seized Crimea illegally, and the first the Russia opened up after they invaded in 2023.
        Crimea only survived due to MASSIVE subsidies from Russia proper, which Russia cannot afford today if the water were once again cut off, even if they could ship it there (which they can't if the bridge is gone). There is no way Russia can ship that much food by sea with Neptunes flying.
        Crimeans might get enough water from pumping groundwater, but food, fuel, and everything else will be in short supply from the early onset. It will be a quick siege and then the Russians will surrender.
        Which is why it will literally be the last battle for the liberation of Ukraine, a formality rather than a furious assault.

        See:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Crimean_Canal

        >TL;DR
        If Ukraine gets to the penninsula Russia is fricked, and has been fricked for a while.

        >Crimea has ONE (1) source of water, and it is the canal passing through the penninsula. 85% of Crimea relies on it for their water and agriculture.
        This was true in 2014, but the Russians build a massive system of pipelines to deliver water, which are still there. Drought was pretty much over by I think 2016?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Crimea contains a whole bunch of naval bases, air bases, air defence. There's also the symbolic value of rendering Russia's cassus belli (the conflict kicked off with Russia seizing Crimea) untenable.

      Free hits

      Logistics and the naval war
      Ukraine has effectively won the war on the sea even though their entire navy of 2 ships was sunk in the opening 24h

      Russia is willing to keep throwing valuable military hardware into it.
      It's like Japan attacking Midway. They barely cared at all about Midway island itself. It was chosen because they knew the US Navy would sally out to defend it (to Japan's detriment, as it turned out)

      there's little depth to AA there - AA systems cannot be as physically close to each other and help each other out as they can be up north, so they're easier to whittle down.

      >there's a tiny passable bottleneck to the penisula making any attack to or from crimea basically impossible
      Every army who took the penninsula in the modern period has also taken Crimea.
      You're forgetting about the deadliest weapon of all, one that has laid low countless armies since time immemorial. Ukraine need not cross the penninsula to take Crimia, nor fire a weapon across it once they gain it, as long as the bridge is also gone.

      Crimea has ONE (1) source of water, and it is the canal passing through the penninsula. 85% of Crimea relies on it for their water and agriculture.
      It was the first thing Ukraine cut off in 2014 after Russia seized Crimea illegally, and the first the Russia opened up after they invaded in 2023.
      Crimea only survived due to MASSIVE subsidies from Russia proper, which Russia cannot afford today if the water were once again cut off, even if they could ship it there (which they can't if the bridge is gone). There is no way Russia can ship that much food by sea with Neptunes flying.
      Crimeans might get enough water from pumping groundwater, but food, fuel, and everything else will be in short supply from the early onset. It will be a quick siege and then the Russians will surrender.
      Which is why it will literally be the last battle for the liberation of Ukraine, a formality rather than a furious assault.

      See:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Crimean_Canal

      >TL;DR
      If Ukraine gets to the penninsula Russia is fricked, and has been fricked for a while.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        whoops, meant to say
        >Crimea relies on [the canal] for 85% of their water and agriculture.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This
        All Ukraine has to do is get close enough to take out the single railway currently connected to Crimea by land and then the bridge. Once those two supply routes are compromised, Crimea is unsustainable and the war is pretty much lost for Russia. Russia doesn't really give a crap about Donetsk and Luhansk, they were only ever bargaining chips for Crimea. Crimea controls all the sea routes into Ukraine and WAS the home of the Black Sea Missile Fleet (ha!).

        People don't understand just how close Ukraine is to winning the war if it can just take a bit more territory to get into rocket range or clear away enough ADA assets to get a clear strike at the bridge with it's future F16s. Once the sustainment routes are compromised, it can't maintain a large enough force in Crimea to defend it properly and it is all over and negotiations have to begin. The thing is, Russia will almost certainly still keep Crimea, Donetsk and Luhansk; the whole conflict right now is just being fought to improve bargaining power at the negotiation table and if Ukraine can essentially cut off Crimea and make it uninhabitable then they will be able to demand whatever they want from Russia short of regaining territory.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Negotiate with monke
          >After a short while, monke completely ignores whatever agreement would have been bargained and starts stirring shit again
          How could someone possibly have foreseen such a turn of events?!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The point is Putler can't start shit ever again because Ukraine could at any time decisively cut off Crimea in the future. Russia couldn't blitz Ukraine at the start off the 3 Day Special Military Operation and will never realistically be able to do so again, especially after coming out of this fight with such catastrophic loses and the fact Ukraine will come out of this with tons of modern arms from Western gimmes. Russian ambitions have continuously fallen from completely sock puppeting Ukraine, to keeping Ukraine in their sphere of influence, to keeping Ukraine out of HATO, to just keeping Crimea, to just not being decisively defeated and humiliated.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            TWO (2) eggs. That's TWO eggs.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Donetsk and Luhansk
          maybe, but those people represent a very toxic internal security threat to Russia, which is why the FSB have spent the last decade killing every bit of LPR/DPR leadership they can find.
          >Crimea
          lol no. That's the sword of Damocles that lead to this moronic chimp-out. The Kerch bridge is also a complete spite structure for shipping and has to be removed. If Ukraine ever pushes to the point where Crimea bleeds water, food, etc then they have no reason not to keep up the pressure until catastrophic RU failure/NOOK.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >if it can just take a bit more territory
          That's a pretty hefty chunk of territory considering the glacial pace frontline has been moving for the last year.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Russia will almost certainly still keep Crimea, Donetsk and Luhansk;
          >they will be able to demand whatever they want from Russia short of regaining territory
          I don't see anything else Ukraine might meaningfully want in these negotiations, to the contrary it has every reason to starve Crimea until ziggers have no choice but to leave.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I don't see anything else Ukraine might meaningfully want in these negotiations
            Security guarantees. From both Russia and the West.
            >That's a pretty hefty chunk of territory considering the glacial pace frontline has been moving for the last year.
            This is why Western weapons are a big deal because it doesn't require territorial gains to close the distance.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Security guarantees. From both Russia and the West.
              Like the Budapest memorandum?

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Security guarantees.
              >From russia

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Security guarantees.
              laughs in minsk
              Putin has to be dead or disposed of first, and the current RU government broadly reformed. There is a reason why the UKR.gov iced any further negotiations until something like that occurs and it isn't because they're being unreasonable; a security guarantee under Putin and his circus is worthless.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              They HAD security guarantees from Russia. They're clearly not worth anything.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Security guarantees. From both Russia and the West.
              They already have them, lurk for Budapest memorandum.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Security guarantees
              I suggest a 100 km 'security guarantee' zone northe and east of the Ukrainian border where all Russian citizens are removed for their own safety, followed by a 300 km demilitarized zone where all Rusian citizens are removed to ease the international control of the demilitarized status, folloewd by a third Peace Guarantee Zone that consist of all Russian territory west of the Volga river where all Russian citizens are removed to guarantee peace.

              We should also construct a wal around Serbia and Albania to safeguard civilization.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      At its very lowest level, Russia failing to prevent Ukrainian strikes is incredibly embarrassing to Moscow and shows they're not at all invulnerable, regardless of the situation at the frontline

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >there's a tiny passable bottleneck to the penisula making any attack to or from crimea basically impossible
      Just adding to what was said here

      [...]
      [...]
      [...]
      [...]
      [...]
      >there's a tiny passable bottleneck to the penisula making any attack to or from crimea basically impossible
      Every army who took the penninsula in the modern period has also taken Crimea.
      You're forgetting about the deadliest weapon of all, one that has laid low countless armies since time immemorial. Ukraine need not cross the penninsula to take Crimia, nor fire a weapon across it once they gain it, as long as the bridge is also gone.

      Crimea has ONE (1) source of water, and it is the canal passing through the penninsula. 85% of Crimea relies on it for their water and agriculture.
      It was the first thing Ukraine cut off in 2014 after Russia seized Crimea illegally, and the first the Russia opened up after they invaded in 2023.
      Crimea only survived due to MASSIVE subsidies from Russia proper, which Russia cannot afford today if the water were once again cut off, even if they could ship it there (which they can't if the bridge is gone). There is no way Russia can ship that much food by sea with Neptunes flying.
      Crimeans might get enough water from pumping groundwater, but food, fuel, and everything else will be in short supply from the early onset. It will be a quick siege and then the Russians will surrender.
      Which is why it will literally be the last battle for the liberation of Ukraine, a formality rather than a furious assault.

      See:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Crimean_Canal

      >TL;DR
      If Ukraine gets to the penninsula Russia is fricked, and has been fricked for a while.

      and here:

      This
      All Ukraine has to do is get close enough to take out the single railway currently connected to Crimea by land and then the bridge. Once those two supply routes are compromised, Crimea is unsustainable and the war is pretty much lost for Russia. Russia doesn't really give a crap about Donetsk and Luhansk, they were only ever bargaining chips for Crimea. Crimea controls all the sea routes into Ukraine and WAS the home of the Black Sea Missile Fleet (ha!).

      People don't understand just how close Ukraine is to winning the war if it can just take a bit more territory to get into rocket range or clear away enough ADA assets to get a clear strike at the bridge with it's future F16s. Once the sustainment routes are compromised, it can't maintain a large enough force in Crimea to defend it properly and it is all over and negotiations have to begin. The thing is, Russia will almost certainly still keep Crimea, Donetsk and Luhansk; the whole conflict right now is just being fought to improve bargaining power at the negotiation table and if Ukraine can essentially cut off Crimea and make it uninhabitable then they will be able to demand whatever they want from Russia short of regaining territory.

      Russia has a huge frontline to defend, and hundreds of thousands of troops there to keep supplied. The existing railway route from Rostov-on-Don is their logistics backbone, but it's not enough on its own. Russia leveraged the Kerch bridge heavily for their southern groups until the rail line was taken out of commission, and it's no accident that Surovikin decided to abandon Kherson shortly afterwards: they were running on borrowed time with whatever stockpiles that hadn't been HIMARS'd.
      The Kerch rail line took enough stress that Russia switched to using naval shipping -- first with their amphibious landing vessels (remember the fireworks show from the Caesar Kunikov in February?), and now with ferries at rail terminals. That they're still using the peninsula after all those setbacks is a clear tell: Russia NEEDS that second supply artery or they'll have to scale back efforts on the frontline. The big push of ~50,000 Russian soldiers in Kharkiv may have been an effort to leverage bodies in an area where supply lines weren't already stretched to their limits.
      Two other pieces of evidence to consider: (1.) Russia is rushing construction on a second rail line in the north that's months away from completion, and (2.) Putin publicly stated that he'd be willing to freeze the conflict at the *current frontlines*, the first time he and his proxies haven't demanded that they be granted whole oblasts at their historical borders.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >what's the point of hitting crimea?
      Logistics, plus it's symbolism to Putin is a major PR blow to his regime
      >there's a tiny passable bottleneck to the penisula making any attack to or from crimea basically impossible
      If Ukraine leaves Crimea with Russia it will forever be a dagger which Russia can use to threaten Ukraine
      While the tiny passage is a problem it is not impassable, if russian defenses are deteriorated enough they will not be able to stop ukrainian advances, especially during winter, Crimea is tough but it is not the impregnable fortress it is made out to be

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >If Ukraine leaves Crimea with Russia it will forever be a dagger which Russia can use to threaten Ukraine
        It works both ways. If Russia ends up with Crimea, it is forever an artery which Ukraine can puncture at any moment and leave Russia bleeding.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          which would be wonderful if Ukraine intended for the conquest of Russia later.
          Tragically that is not the case, so we'll all just have to settle for a return to the 1991 boarders.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      "It has to do with where choo-choo go."

      Russia is heavily reliant upon rail transport for its logistics. The line running from Mariupol to Kherson is too close to Ukrainian artillery and drones to safely use, so the Russian units holding the east bank of the Dnieper are getting most of their supplies via Crimea and the Kerch Strait, with only a trickle coming across the mainland. If that route is lost, then Russia can no longer reliably supply Crimea *or* the parts of Kherson Oblast that they still hold, making them vulnerable to siege or direct attack. Which, in turn, would turn the flank of their forces in Zap, and bypass most of their trenchlines and fortifications.

      Thus, the bombardment of Crimea is rather important, strategically.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Crimea was the whole point of all of this bullshit. Without Crimea Russia can’t project power in the Black Sea.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They know that Russia will keep sending gear there because that's the most important piece of clay that they hold. Out of all the annexed territory Russia holds, that's the one they can't afford to lose. Right now, Ukraine is trying to make it untenable for them there so that either 1. They GTFO, or 2. They keep sending valuable equipment there for them to get easily HIMARS'd.

      Either way, Russia loses

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Basically, anyone in the past century who took the land bridge, took Crimea in turn. Since no-one on the black sea is any kind of naval power, the peninsula is pretty much impossible to resupply by sea.
      Case in point:
      >Nazis come roaring in with Barbarossa, take Ukraine and sweep through Crimea. Sevastopol holds out for a time, but it was never anything more than a suicidal last stand.
      >Soviets start pushing them back and sweep them out of Crimea like they're garbage.
      It's pretty intuitive if you think about it - when you control the land access to a pseudo-island, you win.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    To force Russian naval and air assets out of it, thus giving the Ukrainian military more time to react if they try to do something. Making the southern Ukrainian airspace safer to operate in by removing Russian AA systems and radars. Plus, vatnigs are real proud of taking the peninsula in '14, so their shit getting bombed there probably ruffles some feathers, which might be a nice bonus.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I predict that this year Ukraine will gain control of the southern airspace.

    Allowing them greater force projection over the Black Sea.

    Possibly allowing to implent a blockade on looted grian exports.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You can't find a better textbook tactical nuke target. It's a fortified megastructure that's notoriously hard to destroy with conventional weapons.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    NOOOOOOOKS!!!!!!!

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the problems that russia faces are moronic troops and just overall bad execution of tactics
    if they were properly trained, and actually executed their tactics properly too, along with allowing for more flexibility within the ranks (needs officers), and having proper communication with other branches to try and actually achieve combined arms warfare.
    if the russians actually had their shit together they would have been doing a lot better a long time ago

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They should start torpedoing their own bases, that way the khohols can't strike them.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've a question that isn't really covered but got me wondering:
    After 2014, what happened to the Ukrainians that remained in Crimea? Were they replaced by Russians? Are they just waiting to get rescued back into Ukraine proper?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Many ran away.
      Others stuck around.
      Whole bunch got imprisoned, population transferred to siberia, or god knows what else.
      A frickload of Russians moved in.
      Standard Russian Empire tactics, really.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There were a lot of defections, including about half of the ukrainian officers stationed there, according to ukrainian statements at the time. The remaining ukrainian soldiers returned to ukraine after a pullout was ordered. Civilians were just given Russian passports and life went on, for the most part. About a 100k people (in total the peninsula has a population of about 2.5 million) since the annexation applied for ukrainian passports, since they had family over the border, and some never returned.

      Crimea has very little connection to what today consitutes ukrainian national identity, which is why it had the status of an autonomous republic while it was still part of the ukraine, and why there were strong pro-russian/separatist protests, especially in Sevastopol.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >no 2023 dates
    >still that many strikes
    holy shit this war is gonna get good isn't it?

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