Any reason why transparent aluminium isn't being mass produced yet?

Imagine an airplane that is fully transparent.
It would be trully a stealth airplane.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Any reason why transparent aluminium isn't being mass produced yet?
    It is. It is widely used as ballistic glass.
    >downsides
    alumina ceramics are brittle and very heat-sensitive relative to other aircraft skin materials

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >very heat-sensitive
      They are?
      Not OP, I assumed the brittleness due to what I understand about it's mechanical properties from the little I've looked into it, but I was under the impression any AlON transparent ceramics were sintered under crazy temp and pressure.
      I wouldn't have thought they would be sensitive to temp.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I wouldn't have thought they would be sensitive to temp.
        Generally refractory ceramics are resistant to high temperature but they're too rigid to tolerate the thermal expansion and internal stress due to temperature differences. The exception are glass-ceramic (lithium oxide + refractory ceramic) that have essentially no thermal expansion (internally compensated by positive and negative thermal expansion).

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >get into your glass airplane
    >totally invisible to the naked eye
    >two dozen radar-based SAM systems detect you in the span of one second the instant you cross into contested airspace

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >muh prime directive
      >alters the timeline of the universe

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Who's to say he didn't invent it?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the future is fricked if we don't succeed
        >America is about to invent this shit anyways
        oh no such a fricking paradox

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >it's just that simple

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        there was no temporal prime directive until like DS9 bro. Can't interfere with your own culture.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd rather have transparent titanium

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What I want to know is why haven't they trickled down into civilian windshields? Something like this would be a Godsend against cracking from stray pebbles.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Part of vehicle windshield design is the ability to crack and bend, but not shatter, if a pedestrian is hit and flies up over the hood.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Probably turns into shards, main thing for windshields and stuff is to shatter fairly harmlessly.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's about a hundred times more expensive than bulletproof glass, so it only gets used in things that really need it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's only 5 times as expensive as regular laminated glass.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          try to buy a transparent alumina window for your car moron, 100x is a good estimate.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >What I want to know is why haven't they trickled down into civilian windshields?
      Too expensive, however is is used for phone screens.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    pretty sure its used in hellfire missiles, it's not cheap or easy to produce though.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure the new Adept thunder plate has a transparent aluminum strike face.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This isn't aluminium any more than rust is iron. Now is (alumina) is mass produced and used for a number of applications, but it's way too brittle for major structural components and making it sufficiently non-porous to be properly transparent usually isn't worth the effort.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >fully transparent
    Are you going to make the engines, fuel, weapons and pilot out of transparent material as well?
    Because if you are I'll phone my congressman and tell him to fund you. That sounds rad.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Eveything but the passengers

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm gonna frickin defend the invisible jet.
        Let's assume that it works as it's shown in this stupid-ass cartoon where everything was goofy and you can see the characters inside. Also let's assume that it doesn't have any other explicit radar-defeating tech. It's still going to be super difficult to visually confirm, shoot down, etc. just on the fact that it's near impossible to see.
        As for why Wonder Woman needs a plane when she can fly, I feel like that should be obvious- there's a limited number of people she can carry without a vehicle.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Exactly. She's not Supes

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Even if a plane is "invisible" it's still a solid object and thus detectable by radar

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      wut?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wait, this shit's real?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, a company called Surmet makes it last time I looked into it.
      ALON optical ceramics.
      I always wanted to get a block of it and use an EDM wire feed machine to produce a transparent 1911 frame and slide or something.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That would be extremely fricking cool

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Does EDM even work on materials that aren’t conductive?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No, ordinarily it wouldn't, but I had been reading published research regarding working with AlON, and one that was really promising was a guy who found that you could easily machine it with an EDM machine, provided you spray the material with a light misting of water mixed with low levels of an electrolyte.
          The results were supposed to be just a hair less inaccurate than normal EDM operation.
          For a 1911 slide and frame where you've got tolerances acceptable to run on 100+ year old machines it's perfect.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Define real.
      It's not aluminum, it's a aluminum - oxygen - nitrogen crystal. It's very hard and brittle meaning it cannot flex or deform, meaning it breaks without warning.
      Not suitable for structural components of anything, certainly not for airframes.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >just in, glass is fragile and inflexible

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >glass is fragile and inflexible
          glass most certainly can be flexible anon, don't be stupid. even on purpose.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Are you pretending to be moronic?

          To make it clearer, metal can flex and flow (permanently deform without breaking) to a certain point before breaking.
          Glass can flex, but not flow, which means it breaks without showing signs of strain beforehand.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >transparent aluminium
    >airplane that is fully transparent
    >It would be trully a stealth airplane
    Let's just ignore everything else that isn't made out of transparent aluminium

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >It would be trully a stealth airplane.
    Transparent water, as you can see it's invisible.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How thick does it have to be to withstand the pressure of 18,000 cubic feet of water?

  15. 1 month ago
    Cult of Passion

    >Any reason why transparent aluminium isn't being mass produced yet?
    Plotwist, it makes it undetectable in metal detectors so the formula was seal away.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Why isn't it being mass produced yet?
    It is, it's also super fricking expensive something like $200 per square inch.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It is. It's used in smartphone screens and newer perovskite solar cells.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    homie look at the reflcetions on that thing
    literal beacon in the sky

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Mutts
    >understanding chemistry
    Impossible challenge.
    Transparent aluminium doesn't exist. Metals by their very definition cannot be transparent due to their outer electron layer. What you can make transparent is alumina, also known as aluminium oxide, or Al2O3, or aluminium oxynitride, and both are ceramics, behaving just like Sio2 (quartz glass) - brittle and have low fracture toughness, you cannot build thin frames that withstand extreme tensile loads with the material.
    Polymers, on the other hand, can have high tensile strength and optical transparency, so we might see polyethylene airplanes and helicopters one day.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Metals by their very definition cannot be transparent due to their outer electron layer
      can you explain this please

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Unlike non-metals whose electrons are "stuck in place" and needs some specific "high-energy" photons to displace (very low energy like IR can cause vibrations so absorbs those wavelengths),
        electrons in metals are like a cloud they can move easily. Any photon will make them move thus they'll absorb/reflect incident photons, that make metals opaque to photons.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          cool, thanks anon

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That’s not aluminum, that’s an aluminum compound
    Aluminum is an element, a metal
    Ceramics are comprised of compounds, stop being a fricking moron you fricking moron and go back

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Uh, bro? Even if the airplane was immune to radar (it wouldn't be), radar would pick up the whole-ass dude sitting in it, which would have way higher RCS than any stealth aircraft.

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >85% as hard as sapphire
    So, useless? Sapphire is easily made in large panes in labs these days.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's the part I don't understand, almost as hard, same melting point, similar strength and thermal expansion. What's the difference?
      It sounds more like a ™/patent thing.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's the part I don't understand, almost as hard, same melting point, similar strength and thermal expansion. What's the difference?
      It sounds more like a ™/patent thing.

      The difference is in the manufacturing technique.
      Synthetic sapphire requires you to grow it from a single crystal, while aluminum oxynitride (alon) is sintered, pressed powder.
      Obviously, this allows you to produce a material with similar properties but significantly faster, and also allows you to manufacture a "raw" form dimensionally closer to the final product you imagine, then finish machine and polish it.
      Sapphire would require you to produce a straight "billet" of material and machine the entirety of whatever object you'd like via mass material removal.
      IE with AlON you can produce a cylinder shaped object that can be simply finish machined, but sapphire can't be "grown" in that way.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Lockheed tried this
    Turns out, you can't make an engine transparent

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Didn't Roddenberry basically pull this out of his ass and then it just happened to be possible?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Ehhh yes and no. Like sapphire itself is just aluminum mainly so the concept was theoretically possible at the time, but the process of "forging" aluminum into transparent material was nonsense.
      He probably had some lsd-fueled technical advisor mention it in passing and then vehemently exclaim that it'd be possible in the future, absolutely, and just ran with it.
      I think in the same episode they also basically invented what would become the computer mouse.

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