>$1,600. >a fricking magazine

>$1,600
>a fricking magazine
what the FRICK is their problem?

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ok, just make your own..

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it seems reasonably easy to make tbqh we just need step files

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fire up freecad then and get going loser

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >seems easy to do
        >we just need (all of the work done for me)

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Fire up freecad then and get going loser

          They did the work already, I already pirated mastercam so all I need is models and then it's off to my machinist buddy who will do it gratis
          >working

          • 4 weeks ago
            Sieg

            I’ll knock out the spacers on my table top lathe, you’ll get some tappperjng because my lathe is a heavily modified harbor freight lathe but it won’t matter for this use case

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/TZUYjrK.png

      >$1,600
      >a fricking magazine
      what the FRICK is their problem?

      its fricking three laser cut blanks and some tube stock and fasteners.

      Frick. Its purely razzle dazzle. At that point with it being open air just do a linked feed and call it a night.

      BEHOLD! A MAGAZINE!

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        ok, make your own!

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >product is ridiculous price
          >people talk shit about the ridiculous pricd
          >if it's so easy make your own
          Everytime some consoomer makes this argument and it makes no sense.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Sieg

            It’s a real way to save money, someone else pays for all the research and development and you just copy it.

            Manufacturing is cheap, guys that program and operate cnc machines earn less than McDonald’s employees.

            So in theory yes, you can mill a component on a 3 axis cnc cheaper than a Big Mac costs… the raw materials are cheaper (6061 bar is like less than a dollar a pound) and you can still sell the chips as virgin netting almost what you paid for them

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, it's called an M2 browning with a scope. Hitchwiener issue

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They only intended to make a dozen of them, they need to recoup R&D and machine time somehow.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      But if they made 120 of them, I'd be in at 160. Not 1600 tho.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why do they charge $1.6k for a mag?
    Because they can.

  4. 1 month ago
    Sieg

    Buy one, reverse engineer it.

    I’m fricking moronic , but it only took me 6 months to learn gcode and how to operate and program a cnc machine.

    I have adhd , autism and like 85 iq on a god day when hyped up on 3 monsters

    You guys are way more talented, smart and skilled than I could ever be I bet a solid 7 hours of work and you guys could pop these out no issue

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >took me 6 months to learn gcode and how to operate and program a cnc machine.
      What did you use for resources?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Sieg

        The internet, literally went to a cnc machine website of choice, read the user manual and then found a programming tutorial on YouTube

        Then got a job at some shop

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      fat

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      or just use solidworks and a CAM program. tbf you need access to those

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        also
        >implying that any shop will let you anywhere near their CNC machine with only 6mo of internet training and no operator cert

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          community hacklab? ours has a lathe which you can use with 3h training and exam

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the limiting factor is not how hard it is to make.
      the limiting factor is that your potential demand is absolutely miniscule.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >reverse engineer it.

      homie its a rotary drum mag, theres nothing to reverse engineer, it simply requires a lot of milling.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    buy one send it to china have em pump out 100 for 10 bucks each

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Came here to say exactly this, right down to the price point.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the only really complicated part of this entire mag would be designing the follower, everything else would be easy as shit.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You're not paying for the magazine, you're paying to rent their CNC machine.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Problem? It's israeliteelry for men. It's supposed to be expensive so you can show you're cooler than the poorgays when you post pictures of it on social media.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you shoot enough 50 BMG to need a > 10 round magazines that kind of money is probably not a issue

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      440 rounds at ammoseeks lowest price to pay for the magazine..

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if you own a fricking $10k rifle that shoots $3 rounds just to shoot at trash in the desert, you can afford a $1600 magazine

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      most honest take here

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    stop making these shit, worthless threads

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    would actually be useful in this situation

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      imagine shooting that inside a car lmfao

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    id rather just have a stationary belt fed gun at that point, that magazine probably weighs more than the fricking rifle

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Costs money to make custom mechanical devices with moving parts out of metal.
    It needs to move those rounds reliably, have no burs or things to hang up and cause jams inside, and still look good externally. Every part is probably polished smooth by hand or with extra passes.
    All while designing, making, troubleshooting, and refining a part they are making a small number of.

    When you make a lot of something you can get the cnc operation precise, the feed rate, angles, chip or damage no endmills, able to make several per cutter, etc Playing with prototypes costs a lot more.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it appears to be bare aluminum with visible toolmarks. a high-rpm low feedrate finishing pass is not anything special. machining aluminum is not difficult at all and 4 aluminum flatstock cutouts joined by lathed rod and cap screws are not worth $1,600. Fostech is notoriously israeli with their pricing.
      >t. machinist

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The external part is not likely the hard part.
        The internal rotating gear, probably pawl and other r&d like the curve up into the feed lips. Getting the spring weights right, enough to feed without impacting cycling.
        The initial design probably took much less time than making it, trying it out with hundreds in ammo, adjusting, making new parts, foring another several hundred in ammo, etc
        Anyone can see something that already works and copy dimensions.

        They didn't have some existing design to copy. Scaled up existing drums probably still had some 50 cal issues.
        Then the market is small.

        Making a magazine and testing and refining for reliability takes a lot of ammo. That adds up fast in 50 cal.
        All to sell a small number.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I do not think it took very much from them at all. They appear to have borrowed heavily from their already-existing 12ga drum designs, which themselves borrowed heavily from other drum designs on the market. They aren't exactly reinventing the wheel here, they simply applied established engineering principles to a new caliber. It wouldn't take more than 1 or 2 prototypes for a non-mouthbreather to figure out the feed geometry. You seem to be attempting to justify the price instead of applying occams razor
          >fostech
          >is greedy
          simple as

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Man I could shit this together in Freecad and im not even that good with the fricking program.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Probably, but you'd also have feed and RnD issues that would probably make it cost 100 times more as you worked out the kinks and put silly amounts of hours into it that makes the price look decent actually.
        It's a specialised product for a specialised market, the cost was never the materials and the work done to make it by some labourer, but the RnD cost to design and test it for a small number of potential buyers. This is hard for some people to understand, the cost of expertise in a field and the decades of work to leaen how to make things is often a greater cost than material cost.

        Yes, you l could steal the design off the Internet, but that is still a form of stealing if they don't recoup costs because of it. Ultimately that would be your choice. The price seems fair to me if it works as intended due to the small unit number.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          see

          it appears to be bare aluminum with visible toolmarks. a high-rpm low feedrate finishing pass is not anything special. machining aluminum is not difficult at all and 4 aluminum flatstock cutouts joined by lathed rod and cap screws are not worth $1,600. Fostech is notoriously israeli with their pricing.
          >t. machinist

          and RnD might have been a factor if it were actually a complicated high-tolerance part, but it does literally appear to be 4 pieces of milled flat stock joined by rod and cap screws. I have made fixtures more complicated than this. $1,600 would be reasonable for a one-off (as would the raw finish) but this is ostensibly a finished product. Unacceptable, cringe, grandparent cry. The skeletonized X products drum is mechanically more complicated and would require more than a 3-axis CNC to machine, and is anodized, and sells for like $250. Absolutely no excuse

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's just for show. my dude. Rich kids flexing with their expensive toys and watching the bullets go round and round.
      The audience is small but has money, so the price is high.
      It's the apple cheesegrater monitor stand of guns.

      I don't know man, the finish looks pretty mid.
      RND costs I get, drum mags are notoriously difficult to make reliable, but for 1600 I'd expect better craftmanship.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    As has been stated multiple times, anyone who has enough money to blow 13k on a Barrett rifle on a whim most likely has enough money to buy niche novelty mags on a whim too
    >But it's overpriced
    True, but the intended audience don't care, it's just a drop in the bucket for them

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >MILLED from a SOLID BLOCK of aluminum
    >with plenty of TACTICOOL gaps (building a wall to keep the dirt out has jan 6 vibes. yikes!)
    mutts need to commit suicide asap

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's called production runs. They know they won't sell even 10k of them, so there's literally no sense to make it cheaper.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I would understand $1600 if it were literally one (1) of them. That's prototype money, not a production item

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You're paying for an engineer's time making up a design, milling it on a machine and assembling it/testing it. Its more like buying something from Ferrari than getting a mass produced part.

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Try to reload magazine in gunfight
    >Fumble, drop it in the mud
    >Load it in anyway and start shooting muddy 50 BMG
    What happens next?

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    morons will pay for it.

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